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Topic: Arduino Uno with a 32-bit ARM Cortex-M0 in 28 pin DIL package (Read 10 times) previous topic - next topic

subway

They are more powerful than AVRs but these ARM Cortex-M micro-controllers do not seem easy to work with. See this discussion: http://www.avrfreaks.net/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=viewtopic&t=127016
Too many vendors, too many types of ARMs, too many different peripherals, too many ways to set them.
The huge diversity of ARMs seems to be their main enemy.


Graynomad

#41
Nov 22, 2012, 05:26 am Last Edit: Nov 22, 2012, 05:28 am by Graynomad Reason: 1
There is such a thing as too much choice that's for sure and I reckon that must put people off.

However once you decide on a family (in my case LPC) the chips are actually very easy to use, well the smaller ones anyway. The ability to MUX functions on pins is good and bad, I find that with a large chip (144 or 217 pins) I need a spread sheet to keep track of what function I have on what pin, that can quickly get to be a nightmare.

But as I say the smaller chips are pretty easy to work with, I downloaded LPCXpresso and had a working test program running in minutes.

Once you get your head around a particular family you are right, but if you flit from vendor to vendor you will go nuts.

Truth is the fact that there's an ARM core is irrelevant to most people, it's the peripherals that you deal with and unfortunately they are all different.

FWIW I think the SAM used in the Due is about the best chip in that size, it has some neat features that the Due does not use. But I prefer LPCs because they have a larger range so that what I learn will be largely portable from 8 pins to 217 pins. If I get a Due that will mean learning a whole new set of peripherals (or keeping to high-level code).

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

subway


However once you decide on a family (in my case LPC) the chips are actually very easy to use, well the smaller ones anyway. The ability to MUX functions on pins is good and bad, I find that with a large chip (144 or 217 pins) I need a spread sheet to keep track of what function I have on what pin, that can quickly get to be a nightmare.

Have you tried ARMwizard?
If not (because I am seeing that you have experience with LPC family from NXP) can you try it, when you have time, and tell if this tool for setting ARM peripherals really simplify the work of programmers.

Graynomad

Yes I have, very useful program I think.

I used it when it first came out but at the time it didn't support the 12xx chips and that's what I'm using.

I know it now does but I've since written a HAL framework so don't need it so much however I haven't written drivers for many of the peripherals yet so I think I'll be revisiting ARMwizard to help with that.

_____
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

dhenry

Quote
The huge diversity of ARMs seems to be their main enemy.


That's the part many people don't understand. As most people write code for those chips with C/C++, the arm core is actually transparent to them. The tasks of working with the peripherals remain the same.

As such, I firmly believe this whole transition to arm is more marketing driven.

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