Go Down

Topic: problem porting new bootloader with avrdude (Read 4 times) previous topic - next topic

bperrybap


well i tried more verbose output (-v -v -v -v) but no additional useful info results.

This seems very odd. verbose mode spits out all kinds of stuff to indicate what it is doing.

Quote

any more insights or suggestions?


Post the verbose output here as a file attachment and so we can see what it is doing.

--- bill

john1993

as i mentioned the '>filename' method dont work. is there another way to capture output? you can also try the 2 files i put in post #1 to see for yourself. any help here would be appreciated.

bperrybap


as i mentioned the '>filename' method dont work. is there another way to capture output? you can also try the 2 files i put in post #1 to see for yourself. any help here would be appreciated.


Redirection doesn't work? Really? I bet it does.

avrdude is a typical well behaved commandline tool that uses both stdout and stderr

You have to make sure to redirect everything not just stdout


Code: [Select]
command >output.txt 2>&1

Give that a try.


--- bill


john1993

you would have won that bet. can i ask what the "2>&1" means? it didnt work w/o that and thanks for showing me that trick.

anyway heres the output file. a lot of info instantly scrolled off the screen before but i still see nothing more after the erase. does this tell us anything new?

bperrybap


you would have won that bet. can i ask what the "2>&1" means? it didnt work w/o that and thanks for showing me that trick.

2>&1 means redirect standard i/o output stream #2 to output stream #1

This is part of "standard i/o" (stdio) which is what all unix based programs use.
The numbers represent indexes in to the file structure array.

#1 is stdout (normal output)
#2 is stderr (for errors)

This is very useful when applications use both stdout and stderr
as it allows redirecting errors separately.

This has been part of unix from the beginning for more than 40 years and unix
has been the driving and influential force for much (if not most) of what has been done in computing
over the past several decades.

Microsoft, coming to the game very late in operating systems, emulated this in
their operating system and shells starting in mid/late 80's as part of a
government requirement for POSIX compliance.

That said since "Windows" which is now using the NT kernel is based on the
VMS OS architecture vs Unix OS, some POSIX type things just don't work correctly
on Windows.

Windows makes things worse by using a monolithic approach to applications that
are almost always GUI based. As a result, many useful command line tools
and capabilities are non existent in the windows world. Like a decent scripting shell.

--- bill



Go Up