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Topic: 8x8x8 rgp cube? (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

Hippynerd

I started with a 4x4x4 cube. with just resistors, leds, and an arduino. I would recommend doing what I did, start as simple as possible, then figure out ways to improve it. You will learn why something is a good or bad idea.

Soldering the cube is actually a bit more difficult than mike would lead you to believe (no mike, monkeys dont solder). You may want to look up some instructables.

A 4x4x4 cube can be controlled with nothing but the arduino (using 20 pins), and its about as big as you can get, without getting more complicated, so thats a good starting point. You will learn how to solder up a 3D object without using a PCB, which is challenging for most. You will also learn about multiplexing (a good time to learn abut charlieplexing too, but you may want to save charlieplexing for a different project.)

After you have mastered a simple cube, you can move on to learning how to control many inputs/outputs with a few control lines using electronic components for converting parallel data into serial data. Shift registers are a good start, there are also more sophisticated ways using LED drivers, which is where things get really complicated... so start with shift registers, then drivers.

I made an instructable to explain how to convert the 4x4x4 cube to use shift registers, it can be found here:
http://www.instructables.com/id/4x4x4-LED-cube-upgrade-with-Shift-Registers-74hc5/

RGB is just 3 LEDs where you used to have 1 LED, but it really does complicate matters quite a bit. I started with a n 8 LED setup using ShiftPWM, its well documented and supported here, so its what I used to learn more about controlling RGB LEDs.

I am anxiously awaiting for some RGB LEDs to arrive, I have plans on making a 4x4x4 RGB charlieplexed cube that uses no other electronic components (64 RGB LEDs, Solder,Wires, Arduino ) If all goes well (which probably wont...) I may do an 8x8x8 charlie cube. Thats 512 LEDs, and over 2,000 solder joints!

liamd-07

#11
Nov 20, 2012, 06:20 am Last Edit: Nov 20, 2012, 07:01 am by liamd-07 Reason: 1
Ok thanks guys i will look into the smeller one! But now my teacher is saying i have to find one that runs off a 18m or o8m pickaxe? Is that possible i think he is reluctant to use an Arduino because he hasn't before( Me either) But all the  cubes i see are on arduino's??

I have no idea what the difference between the two are!

Are arduinos difficult to use they just seem to be the one that everybody uses?

retrolefty

#12
Nov 20, 2012, 07:06 am Last Edit: Nov 20, 2012, 07:08 am by retrolefty Reason: 1

Ok thanks guys i will look into the smeller one! But now my teacher is saying i have to find one that runs off a 18m or o8m pickaxe? Is that possible i think he is reluctant to use an Arduino because he hasn't before( Me either) But all the  cubes i see are on arduino's??

I have no idea what the difference between the two are!

Are arduinos difficult to use they just seem to be the one that everybody uses?


I've used picaxe chips around three years or so ago. There will be a really maximum speed difference between a arduino running optimized compiled C++ code and a picaxe chip running tokenized Basic code. Might be fine for smaller led cubes but I would really do some research on it. There is/was very friendly and helpful people on the picaxe forum and if I were you I would certainly ask them if anyone has ever built a led cube of the dimensions you want and find out if it's been done successfully before or not.

Lefty

liamd-07

Thanks heaps retrolefty i will certainly go on there forum haha! Any other suggestions on wiring schematics would be helpful to!

fungus


Ok thanks guys i will look into the smeller one! But now my teacher is saying i have to find one that runs off a 18m or o8m pickaxe? Is that possible i think he is reluctant to use an Arduino because he hasn't before( Me either) But all the  cubes i see are on arduino's??

I have no idea what the difference between the two are!


pickaxe is programmed using BASIC, Arduino is programmed using C++.


Are arduinos difficult to use they just seem to be the one that everybody uses?


C++ is much more suited to microcontrollers, but more difficult to learn.

C++ will run much faster and allow much finer control over timing, this is important for things like LED cubes.
No, I don't answer questions sent in private messages (but I do accept thank-you notes...)

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