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Topic: Genius behind resistors stripe code and electrolytic cap wire length? [rant] (Read 3494 times) previous topic - next topic

Nick Gammon

It was alright when they had a gold or silver stripe, but these new ones I look at and can't work out which end I'm supposed to read from.

But I agree, in the olden days, you would look at the last colour and see the general range (eg. K, ohms, Meg) and then quickly see the other, eg. red/red would be 22.
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info:
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

GaryP

I teach color codes for myself when I was 8-9 years old, and they will never go away from my head, I probably forget my name before those codes. But, that must have something to do with age, I started to play guitar four years ago, and still haven't learn to read musical notes...

What I think about crying because of color codes... they are so much easier, and you have all the time in the world to read them; try to play music note by note, you will be kicked out the band... I hate notes!!!!
;)

Cheers,
Kari
The only law for me; Ohms Law: U=R*I       P=U*I
Note to self: "Damn! Why don't you just fix it!!!"

Boffin1

Back in the early 60s I  lived near EMI factory, and instead of sorting out their boxes of resistors, they dumped the lot, and we budding radio hams would recycle them from the tip , and seperate them into values, so we got to know the colours well.

( never quite got rid of the tip smell though :-)  )

My favourite colour was always the 47k   (  I have to think here to write it down - Yellow Mauve Orange  )  which without prompting was  also my Daughters favourite " pretty " one whan she used to help me assemble many years ago.


G_Man

I can read the resistor color codes just fine... EXCEPT when they decide they're going to use all pastel shades for the codes and put them on 1/8th watt resistors...  Hmmm, is that lavender or gray?  I mean if you're going to use a color code, make the colors easily distinguishable, especially if the part is really small.  Of course at my age the extra light and magnification thing is a must as well.

Graynomad

What I will never understand is that most devices are designed by males, and a high percentage of males are colour blind to some degree.

And given that red/green is the most common form of colour blindness, what the hell is with all the devices that use dual colour r/g LEDs, like battery chargers? Often I can't tell the difference, if there are some red and some green I can see that they are different to each other and deduce which is which because some are "redder" than the others. But if they are all the same I've nothing to compare with and I have a hell of a time.

What's wrong with flashing to differentiate? Everyone can tell the difference between a flashing LED and a non-flashing LED.

_____
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

Boffin1

Quote
2 reasons for the resistor:
1) it is easier to produce a stripe coding printer than a text printer.
2) It doesn't matter how the resistor is soldered, the rings are always visible. (also from a distance)


Thinking about this ,  many of us older guys can't read the codes from a distance on the smaller resistors ( or sometimes up close without a magnifying glass :-)  )

And if I want a leaflet/business card printed, its cheapest with one colour, and goes up for more colours.

If manufacturers used white on a darker background ( as they do on smd caps and res ) you would think it would be cheaper.

They have pad printers that can print on curved surfaces, and have been printing a band plus text on diodes for 50 years now.

I am guessing the diodes are rolled over the ink transfer medium ????

Osgeld

well they make resistors with number codes on them (not only SMD)

ie



but again with axial leads its never going to be in the right place to read and IMO they are just as hard to read as stripes, maybe even harder cause everyone has a different marking ... one company's datasheet uses their in house part number ... figure that out without a freaking spreadsheet.
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

GaryP


They have pad printers that can print on curved surfaces, and have been printing a band plus text on diodes for 50 years now.

I am guessing the diodes are rolled over the ink transfer medium ????


I simply hate those small diodes with unredable text, many times looks like that text is designed to fade away before user get it...

Cheers,
Kari
The only law for me; Ohms Law: U=R*I       P=U*I
Note to self: "Damn! Why don't you just fix it!!!"

Osgeld

http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

Boffin1

I needed a magnifying glass to read them even in my twenties :-)

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