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I'm looking to dive into the word of embedded code once more. The first time (15 years ago) was with the PIC family of chips, but now fresh ideas and Google have brought me here.

It seems things have become very much more convenient since the mid nineties, but one thing occurs about the Arduino MCU-on-a-board approach. It's fine for education and experimentation, but what if you want to develop a series of projects? Am I right in thinking that each project requires a new development board, which once the bugs are ironed out, will be permanently housed in whatever device was being developed? If so, it seems the user is paying a premium for that convenience.

Apologies for what may be a lame question, but I'd prefer to proceed with a minimum of misconceptions. This time :-)

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I'm looking to dive into the word of embedded code once more. The first time (15 years ago) was with the PIC family of chips, but now fresh ideas and Google have brought me here.

It seems things have become very much more convenient since the mid nineties, but one thing occurs about the Arduino MCU-on-a-board approach. It's fine for education and experimentation, but what if you want to develop a series of projects? Am I right in thinking that each project requires a new development board, which once the bugs are ironed out, will be permanently housed in whatever device was being developed? If so, it seems the user is paying a premium for that convenience.

Apologies for what may be a lame question, but I'd prefer to proceed with a minimum of misconceptions. This time :-)



No, just search around for 'arduino standalone' projects. You will see you can either purchase very stripped down minimum component boards or modules that will run the compiled code you uploaded to the chip on your standard arduino board, or you can make your own that is integrated with the other components of your final project. That is one of the great aspects of the arduino platform, that you can easily adapt your development code into standalone project boards or modules.

Lefty
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Thanks for that.
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and for simple projects, check out the "shrinkify" arduino youtube video (uses attiny chip at about $2 each).
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