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Topic: Calculation of maximum current a battery can provide (Read 236 times) previous topic - next topic

usmanqadir91

How can i calculate the maximum current a battery can provide if the only information i have is: 7.2 V / 11.5 Wh / 1600 mAh.

I know that if i can multiply C rate with Ah i can get maximum current of battery, however, most of the batteries lacks this information. Is there any other to calculate maximum output current of battery?

septillion

Simple, you can't :) So the save option would be to stay under 1C.
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INTP

Call the maker. Amp draws that are stated are a guarantee but batteries don't have predictable maximums.
Any battery that gets shorted, for example, will use up an unpredictable amount of current until it dies. And before that, you have no idea what kind of damage occurs inside.

usmanqadir91

Call the maker. Amp draws that are stated are a guarantee but batteries don't have predictable maximums.
Any battery that gets shorted, for example, will use up an unpredictable amount of current until it dies. And before that, you have no idea what kind of damage occurs inside.
Can you let me know the discharge rate of NP-F Lithium-Ion Batteries?

INTP

I see that you quoted me, but it appears that you have not read a single bit of it.

vinceherman

@usmanqadir91, you are asking questions but providing very little information.

Which battery are you using?
"7.2 V / 11.5 Wh / 1600 mAh." gives us very little to go on.  "NP F" is only marginally more useful.
Can you provide a link to the battery you want to use so that we are not guessing?

What are you trying to do with that battery?
Knowing what kind of current draw you are expecting will help us make recommendations.




androidfanboy

Do you have a link to this battery so we can see? Max discharge current for lipo's depend on the application. For example, quadcopter lipo's generally tend to have very high discharge currents (like 20-25C)
"Genius: one percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration." - Thomas Edison

MarkT

How can i calculate the maximum current a battery can provide if the only information i have is: 7.2 V / 11.5 Wh / 1600 mAh.

I know that if i can multiply C rate with Ah i can get maximum current of battery, however, most of the batteries lacks this information. Is there any other to calculate maximum output current of battery?
No.

You can measure internal resistance, you can even look up the datasheet, but there
isn't enough information to calculate power from capacity as they are different properties.

For instance a vehicle 12V battery and a deep cycle 12V battery might look the same, weigh the same,
have similar capacities, but one could be rated for 800A, the other for 50A...
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

Noobian

For instance a vehicle 12V battery and a deep cycle 12V battery might look the same, weigh the same,
have similar capacities, but one could be rated for 800A, the other for 50A...
You can say the same for a Lithium Cobalt cell and a Lithium Manganese cell. They both look the same in 18650 form and has same voltage but their discharge current varies substantially.

DVDdoug

I just looked for a random battery datasheet, and it lists 3 discharge currents:
 Standard Discharge Current
 Rapid Discharge Current
 Max Pulse Discharge Current

If that's not listed, there should be some discharge curves showing/listing current and those test-conditions might give you a good idea of the recommended limits.

This particular battery is also specified not to burn-up or explode when shorted, and the internal resistance is listed (so you could theoretically calculate short-circuit current) but it does NOT say the battery won't be damaged/distroyed by short-circuiting (it may have an internal fuse or a thermal fuse).




usmanqadir91

@usmanqadir91, you are asking questions but providing very little information.

Which battery are you using?
"7.2 V / 11.5 Wh / 1600 mAh." gives us very little to go on.  "NP F" is only marginally more useful.
Can you provide a link to the battery you want to use so that we are not guessing?

What are you trying to do with that battery?
Knowing what kind of current draw you are expecting will help us make recommendations.




Thank you for your reply. I have very little information as well. The battery i am using is the camera battery manufactured by SONY with model number NP-FM55H. However, the only information mentioned on the website and battery is that i mentioned above. Here is the link for your reference.
https://esupport.sony.com/US/p/model-home.pl?mdl=NPFM55H

usmanqadir91

Do you have a link to this battery so we can see? Max discharge current for lipo's depend on the application. For example, quadcopter lipo's generally tend to have very high discharge currents (like 20-25C)
Here is the link of the battery i am using
https://esupport.sony.com/US/p/model-home.pl?mdl=NPFM55H

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