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Topic: Programming in C (Read 5 times) previous topic - next topic

pico

#45
Nov 23, 2012, 04:52 pm Last Edit: Nov 23, 2012, 04:55 pm by pico Reason: 1

"bool" works... I use it all the time.


Yes, so do I. Why would you even want to use "boolean"?

But try "boolean" (which is the "standard" in "Arduino Language") on a C/C++ compiler and see what it thinks of it! (Probably much the same as what I think of it, actually.)

And why is "boolean" supposed to be any easier for a beginner than "bool" anyway? It's introducing difference for the sake of difference! Madness.

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pico


I would add, however, that K&R is probably beyond the comprehension of most C programmers and 99.99% of the arduino community. Without years or programming, making mistakes and tracking down those nasty bugs, it is not possible to appreciate it fully.


I must disagree. I think the book is clear and simply written so that it is very suited to the novice C programmer. It was the first book I bought for learning C, and now of course it is used as a reference.

If I knew of a better book to get into C programming, I'd recommend it. I don't, however.

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retrolefty



"bool" works... I use it all the time.


Yes, so do I. Why would you even want to use "boolean"?

But try "boolean" (which is the "standard" in "Arduino Language") on a C/C++ compiler and see what it thinks of it! (Probably much the same as what I think of it, actually.)

And why is "boolean" supposed to be any easier for a beginner than "bool" anyway? It's introducing difference for the sake of difference! Madness.




So what is your purpose for all your 'arguments'? That the arduino developers should see the sins of their way and redo the platform to attain C/C++ purity? Or is to make sure that beginners be made aware that they are not choosing to take the true path towards C/C++ priesthood by using the arduino IDE? Or that anyone that tells arduino beginners that the arduino platform is using C/C++ as it's programming language are leading them down a destructive path similar to what a crack dealer might do or say? Or is this all about nerds just discussing nerd topic to each other, which I really do enjoy by the way.  ;)

Lefty  

pico

#48
Nov 23, 2012, 05:27 pm Last Edit: Nov 23, 2012, 05:33 pm by pico Reason: 1
The purpose to all my 'arguments' is to critically examine the claim that "there is no 'Arduino Language' -- it is programmed in C++".

C++ is a standardized programming language. "Arduino language" varies, and in some places varies considerably, from that standard. That's why I think calling it a "dialect" is most appropriate.

Also, don't forget the claim that there is an "Arduino programming language" is proposed by "Team Arduino" itself on the home page of this web site. So it seems quite reasonable for newcomers to come in with that expectation. To be then told "no, there's no 'Arduino programming language', it's just C++" isn't quite accurate, in my opinion.

In any case I don't think it is unreasonable to alert beginners, casual observers, and the unwary generally, to the differences. Or even just that there _are_ differences.

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retrolefty

Quote
In any case I don't think it is unreasonable to alert beginners, casual observers, and the unwary generally, to the differences.


Your points do have merit I'm sure, don't misunderstand me. What would you suggest be a nice concise and accurate 'standardized' response one should post when a beginner asks "what programming language is the arduino using"? One sentence would be nice if possible, and no nerd words would be helpful.  ;)

Lefty

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