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Topic: Arduino Nana + Batteries + GSM Module - possible or not? (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

mauried

A typical AA battery is around 2500 mah , and the battery voltage is 1.2 V if its a rechargeable
or 1.5 V if its a primary battery.
To run an Arduino you need either 5V regulated , or higher if you want to use the onboard regulator
on the Arduino board.
So you need at least 4 1.5 V AA batteries in series , or 5 1.2 V in series.
Even thats a bit marginal for the onboard voltage regulator.
With batteries in series , the same current flows through them all, so the mah capacity of the series
batteries is the same as one of them .

snowhite

#6
Nov 27, 2012, 11:04 pm Last Edit: Nov 27, 2012, 11:07 pm by snowhite Reason: 1

To run an Arduino you need either 5V regulated , or higher if you want to use the onboard regulator
on the Arduino board.
So you need at least 4 1.5 V AA batteries in series , or 5 1.2 V in series.
Even thats a bit marginal for the onboard voltage regulator.


Maurid - Thanks again for the input. I have few other questions related based on your feedback:
1- Would I not be in a better position to use a 9V battery then than AAs?
2- I assume that regulated needs extra equipment and I want to stay from that. Does the onboard regulator allow a 9v battery to connect to it or any other battery like AA to connect to directly with a simple wire?
3- I assume I am better off with a Lithium-ion battery of all options above. If so, what type of Lipo battery best works with Arduino?
4- How would my situation be different if I were to use an Arduino Nano?

Thanks,

mauried

If you mean the little rectangular 9V batteries, they have very low capacity, around 200 mah
so wont last very long.
LIPO batteries are much better capacity wise, but the cells are 3.7 V so you need 2 in series
to power an Arduino.
But LIPO batteries need a special  balance charger if you are charging 2 or more at the same time.
With any kind of project that has a Radio Transmitter in it , as the Transmitter generally is what pulls most of the
power, its important to know just how much of the total time the Transmitter will be on.

snowhite

Thanks for the info.

Would my situation be any different if I were to use Arduino Nano?
Also, I am looking to buy a kit or maybe separate parts. What parts do you suggest I should to get me started on some testing/playing with Arduino?

Thanks

mauried

No, running any kind of Arduino off AA batteries is generally a bad idea unless you
can take some kind of drastic power reduction type strategies such as sleeping the Micro,
or you are happy to frequently replace the batteries.
This reduces the power consumption whilst the Micro sleeps, but it also cant do anything
whilst it sleeps, apart from wakeup on specific conditions.
But this doesnt help if you are using a GSM module which draws power all the time.
Basically, you need to figure out how often the GSM module will be transmitting, as thats
the big power consumer, and that will determine the battery life.


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