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Topic: what do you mean by biasing? (Read 731 times) previous topic - next topic

diaryrashid

hello everyone
i have some question

1- what do u mean by biasing in transistor??

2-list the different types of biasing?

3- what is the operating point or Q point of transistor?

4-why it necessary to have a CAPACITOR between the input and the base of the transistor?

thanx

Docedison

Tell Me... What Does Google say?

Bob
--> WA7EMS <--
"The solution of every problem is another problem." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
I do answer technical questions PM'd to me with whatever is in my clipboard

diaryrashid

sorry my english is not so good to search it in google and find the answers...i want a suitable answers that's why i asked in here

Tom Carpenter

Your english is good enough to ask here.
Just thought I'd point out that you get 1.7 million google hits if you search 'biasing in transistor', and the first hit has information on questions 1-3.

Is it just me or does this sound like a school/uni assignment.
~Tom~

Docedison

Also looks like someone needs a source of likely clues and a better excuse than his command of the English language, when he "Can" search in his "Native" tongue Too...

Bob
--> WA7EMS <--
"The solution of every problem is another problem." -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
I do answer technical questions PM'd to me with whatever is in my clipboard

diaryrashid

Mr.Bob if u dont help me so dont speak.please

jackrae

Well Bob, that's you off someone's Christmas card list  :)

Lakes

Off to the naughty step for Mr Bob!

Arrch

I don't get it; Your English isn't good enough to read information from a Google search, but it is good enough to read information posted on a forum in English?

JoeN

Biasing a transistor helps it switch between master and slave devices.  True fact.  You heard it here first.
I have only come here seeking knowledge. Things they would not teach me of in college.

MarkT

Normally biasing refers to the DC conditions of the transistor, when used to amplify or process a small-amplitude signal.  The standard analysis treats the signal as the sum of a DC value and a small AC component, and it is assumed the AC response is linear due to the small amplitude.

The nature of the bias point affects the transconductance of the device in the small-signal model.

So typically the capacitors you see are to separate the DC bias resistor network from the ac signal source (or load).

Simple!
[ I won't respond to messages, use the forum please ]

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