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Topic: Controlling volume from speakers (Read 3 times) previous topic - next topic

Grumpy_Mike

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Debate this topic with the people who challenged me about it being 10v AC on this thread:

http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,141844.0.html

PeterH, PaulS & sbright33 specifically.

I don't see anything in that thread to support your assumption that they were disagreeing with what I said. Yes some questioned the -5V bit but no one said it was wrong. It does not generate -5V BUT the speaker "SEES" +/- 5V.

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which I see you've modified from your post so it seems you're already questioning yourself.

No I haven't, I am explaining more of the theory to you. You seem to be latching onto words you don't fully understand.

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50% is the loudest, but 25% will be lower volume. 

No it sounds different but the peak volume is the same because the peak amplitude is the same. There are a different mix of harmonics in the 25% wave than the 50% wave so maybe your ears are not responding equally to the different harmonic mix. You seem to have a very simplistic view of an audio signal.

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I don't have a horse in this race,

That saddens me, I would have thought you would want to understand what you have done.


teckel

#21
Jan 29, 2013, 06:56 am Last Edit: Jan 29, 2013, 04:54 pm by teckel Reason: 1

Quote
Debate this topic with the people who challenged me about it being 10v AC on this thread:

http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,141844.0.html

PeterH, PaulS & sbright33 specifically.

I don't see anything in that thread to support your assumption that they were disagreeing with what I said. Yes some questioned the -5V bit but no one said it was wrong. It does not generate -5V BUT the speaker "SEES" +/- 5V.


I suggest you read that thread again.  Here's their quotes if you had a problem finding them:

Quote from: PeterH

So it gets 5V in alternate directions, instead of 5V one way and then 0V for half a cycle? In effect it's 5V AC rather than the 2.5V AC of the standard output. Yes, I can see how that would increase the output.


Quote from: sbright33

Or you could use a 10c transistor to amplify the 2.5v AC signal.


Quote from: vasquo

But I still don't get how you'll generate a -5 volts (with respect to ground), to achieve a +5V - (-5V) = 10V range


Quote from: PaulS

I'm missing something, I guess. How will two +5V to 0 to +5V pins toggling out of phase result in a -5V output?


These people are clearly saying that the tone library is normally 2.5 volts and toneAC can't be 10 volts.  They're not being as argumentative as you, but they are challenging your argument.  Also, if you read my comments you'll see that I was clearly stating that the speaker sees it as a +/- 5 volt signal.  We're on the exact same side dude!  But, they wanted to argue that it was only 5 volts, they couldn't understand that the speaker would see it as +/- 5 volts, and wanted to argue that the normal tone library was only 2.5 volts.  I didn't care to argue so I didn't.  But, it's obvious you're looking for an argument.  This sounds like a great debate that you all can get involved in.  Argue your differences with those that care instead of being a troll here, you're not helping this thread.


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which I see you've modified from your post so it seems you're already questioning yourself.

No I haven't, I am explaining more of the theory to you. You seem to be latching onto words you don't fully understand.


Yeah, *I* don't understand.  Yet, I wrote the library and you didn't.  How about you and the people listed above come to a consensus and then let us all know who doesn't fully understand.  *I*, the guy who wrote the library, doesn't care which of you are more right.  The concept is exactly the same, twice as much voltage is getting to the transducer, and it's therefore much louder.


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50% is the loudest, but 25% will be lower volume.  

No it sounds different but the peak volume is the same because the peak amplitude is the same. There are a different mix of harmonics in the 25% wave than the 50% wave so maybe your ears are not responding equally to the different harmonic mix. You seem to have a very simplistic view of an audio signal.


Yeah, that's me, simplistic.  The guy who wrote the library and tested the sound pressure level with a SPL meter (not my ears) and created a linear volume control for the library that works.  Have you even tried the library?  Have you listened to it with your ears?  Or measured the output with a sound pressure level meter as I have?  It doesn't seem you have, as if you did, volume level 1 and 10 are clearly quite a bit different in SPL, to my ears, yours, and to a meter designed to measure SPL.  But, maybe your superior ears will hear volume level 1 and level 10 as the same SPL.  You can then call my library worthless and delete it, I won't be offended.  But, you probably shouldn't comment on something you haven't tried.  Who knows, maybe you can still learn something?  Unlikely, I'm sure, but you never know.


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I don't have a horse in this race,

That saddens me, I would have thought you would want to understand what you have done.


It would seem that you should want to know what *I* have done, not the other way around.  I wrote the library on purpose, it wasn't an accident as you seem to want to imply.  I didn't discover something, this is common knowledge, and I'm surprised that the tone library wasn't written to work like toneAC in the first place.  Or, wasn't rewritten correctly by someone far smarter than myself, like you maybe?

Honestly, how about you just go troll somewhere else.  I've already given you the people who have an alternate view and tried to express that we have the same view (speaker sees it as +/- 5v).  If you're looking for an argument, take it up with them.  Maybe after you can come back and let us know who got schooled.  Can I express anymore how little *I* care who is right?  I think it boils down to perception, or semantics at best.

Tim
Arduino - Teensy - Raspberry Pi
My libraries: NewPing - LCDBitmap - toneAC - NewTone - TimerFreeTone

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