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Topic: TelnetClient example (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

Cybernetician

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Before I move on, please describe a real-world scenario for this TelnetClient example

http://arduino.cc/blog/2012/11/16/ardupower/
From Idea To Invention

PaulS

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Before I move on, please describe a real-world scenario for this TelnetClient example.

If you have a telnet server that you want to exchange data with, you would know that server name, and probably have access to log in to it, and determine if it had a telnetd daemon running.

If you have a telnet server, you'd use a telnet client to talk to it.

Telnet is insecure. The cases where it is used are rapidly being phased out. Most cases that remain have both the client and the server on the same network, behind a firewall.

No one runs a public telnet server that you can connect to.

dxw00d


Before I move on, please describe a real-world scenario for this TelnetClient example.  how would I know whether what is a telnet server running daemon?


If you have a Windows PC, you can enable the telnet server service.

encryptor


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Before I move on, please describe a real-world scenario for this TelnetClient example

http://arduino.cc/blog/2012/11/16/ardupower/


Would I be correct to say that if I want to control devices remotely I would need a telnet server?  The PC with ArduPower would be the client and the PC used to control from remote location would be the server?

peace*&^

PaulS

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Would I be correct to say that if I want to control devices remotely I would need a telnet server?  The PC with ArduPower would be the client and the PC used to control from remote location would be the server?

No. There are other ways to have two computers talk to each other. telnetd monitors one port. httpd monitors a different port. snmpd and popd monitor other ports. Each of these daemons supports different protocols. Which protocol to use depends on the kind of information you want to exchange.

Telnet's only advantage is that is doesn't impose a protocol. That it doesn't is also it's biggest security risk. If a client can tell the server to do anything, security just flew out the window.

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