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Topic: Where can I find an insertion tool? (Read 864 times) previous topic - next topic

AverageGuy

Located in the US.  I purchased a 28 pin insertion tool but it turns out it was the 0.6 " variety for things like EPROMs.  I need an insertion tool for the ATMEGA 328.  Does anyone know of a source?  I can't seem to find it in the usual component shops, Newark, Mouser, etc.

Thanks,
Jim.

dc42

I've checked my usual suppliers and I haven't found one. Is there a particular reason you want an insertion tool? It's easy enough to insert ICs without one. If the leads are splayed too far, just press all the leads on one side against a flat surface to bend them in slightly, and repeat on the other side.
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MarkT

That begs the question: "why are the legs splayed on DIP ICs?"

I suspect it's to prevent them falling out when a board is turned upside down during manual or automatic board-stuffing.
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Krupski


Located in the US.  I purchased a 28 pin insertion tool but it turns out it was the 0.6 " variety for things like EPROMs.  I need an insertion tool for the ATMEGA 328.  Does anyone know of a source?  I can't seem to find it in the usual component shops, Newark, Mouser, etc.

Thanks,
Jim.


Do you mean a ZIF socket? If so, Sparkfun has a 28 pin ZIF socket with 0.300 pin spacing: https://www.sparkfun.com/products/9175

Note that the socket is labeled "TFXTDOL" which at a glance looks like "TEXTOOL".... but unfortunately it's not TEXTOOL but a cheap Chinese knockoff (you're not going to be able to buy a real TEXTOOL socket for $3.00)!  :)

Don't worry though... it's built quite well and works just fine. I've got several of them.
Gentlemen may prefer Blondes, but Real Men prefer Redheads!

kf2qd

I have one attached to the end of my right arm. I have an opposite hand unit attached to my left arm, but the right handed one seems to perform better...

oric_dan

The age-old method some of us use is to bend each of the pins inwards a bit using your
finger, then insert. Unless it's a machine-pin socket, the angles on the socket tabs guide
the pins to their proper positions.

First, touch something metal and grounded to discharge any static electricity on your hand.
Don't wear wool or nylon.

retrolefty

I worked for decades in field service replacing DIP packaged ICs in both sockets and unsoldered PCBs and never bothered with using an insertion tool, just too slow and awkward and not really needed. As others have said its easy to make the pins more parallel and perpendicular by binding them as a group on each side against a wood surface. Now extraction tools I've found useful and quicker then the bend each end at a time back and forth method.

Lefty

AverageGuy

I've been bending pins the manual way since the 555 came out and the 741 appeared in DIP format, so I'm familiar with that method.  Heck I thought I invented it.    8)  It's just that I'm getting a bit older and find my manual dexterity isn't quite what it was 40 years ago.  Thanks for the tips, however. I'll look for a pin straightener. 

Thanks,
Jim.

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