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Topic: Need help with finding a buzzer / audio device (Read 501 times) previous topic - next topic

kasperhangard

Hello guys. i need help with finding some sort of audio device for a project. what i need is a buzzer which i can use with my arduino uno. i don't know alot about electronics so i hoped you could help me? :)

we have limited websites to choose components from in denmark, so i have two different buzzers. which one should i pick, or do you have a better idea for a buzzer / audio device. it just has to be able to make a beep sound.

should i choose this:
Buzzer PCB continuous tone 12Vdc 97dB
http://docs-europe.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/0f2a/0900766b80f2a587.pdf

or this?
Buzzer PCB 75dB 3000Hz 1.5-24Vdc
http://docs-europe.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/009c/0900766b8009c28c.pdf

the main thing is that i see they are AC right? will that work with arduino?
sorry for being a noob :)

DVDdoug

It looks like either of those will work.

Quote
the main thing is that i see they are AC right? will that work with arduino?
Let's start with this:   An  Arduino digital output-pin puts-out (about) 5VDC when on and (about) 0V when off.  The I/O pins are rated for 40mA maximum, and the actual current depends on the impedance/resistance of the "load" that you connect (Ohm's Law).

What you need is a piezo device that works at 5V and "draws" less than 40mA.

There are two types of "noise making' pizeo devices.   A DC piezo buzzer  has a sound generating circuit built-in.   You simply apply a DC voltage and it makes noise.

A piezo transducer is like an audio speaker, and you need to apply an AC signal.   

You can use either one with the Arduino.   Of course, a buzzer is slightly  easier to use.   A transducer requires you to provide an "AC" signal.   You can generate a 5V, 2kHz square wave by switching the Arduino's output pin on-and-off 2000 times per second (easy to do in software).   The advantage is that with the Arduino generating the signal, you can control the frequency (pitch).

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