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Author Topic: 3 LCD Pocket Scopes at DealExtreme  (Read 2028 times)
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I found these at the DealExtreme website.

DS0201 2.8" LCD Pocket Mini Oscilloscope V1.5 Complete Kits (Upgraded Version): http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.39753

DS0201 2.8" LCD Pocket Mini Oscilloscope V1.5 Device (Micro SD/TF Card Slot): http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.39750

DS0201 2.8" LCD Pocket Mini Oscilloscope V1.5 Complete Kits (Micro SD/TF Card Slot): http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.39749

Details are on the respective product pages. They look very much like the DSO nano that Seeedstudio sells.

Note: Prices include shipping
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Just wonder how good they are, I got quite a few items from deal extreme, and they were all cheap, but the quality was after the price too.

Remember to tell that you get points if people use those links. smiley-wink
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Beware!
I ordered the complete kit version on 10/25/10.  It never arrived nor did they reply to my Emails.  As soon as I filed a Paypal dispute  on 11/16/10 they refunded most - $1.99 USD  short - of my money.

CR
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So many projects, so little time...and money!
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You can buy a working scope here:  http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/dso-nano-v2-p-681.html?cPath=104_108&zenid=83f0c199e2cfbf32e41e273c23136db2
What you are looking at on deal extreme is the DSONano V1.
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Beware!
I ordered the complete kit version on 10/25/10.  It never arrived nor did they reply to my Emails.  As soon as I filed a Paypal dispute  on 11/16/10 they refunded most - $1.99 USD  short - of my money.

CR
Strange, I order stuff from them weekly (and in periods daily ;D), never missed anything. And only once did I get a thing where something was missing, so I send them an email, 48 hours later I got a reply, and they send me a new item.

And with all the things I have ordered, I think it all sums up to somewhere between 80 and 100 orders...
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I gave up on DealExtgreme after my first (failed) order.
First the item (400USD) was in stock, then it wasn't, then it was but never shipped.
I contacted PayPal, took it to dispute, magically 5 minutes later, I got a refund.
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Regarding these scopes (in general):

Unless you absolutely, positively need a scope, and you have no other means to diagnose a particular issue, take the money you would've spent on one of these, and put it away to save it for a real scope.

These small "pocket scopes", while neat in and of themselves, aren't much use beyond mostly "audio frequencies"; the bandwidth of these is supposed to be "1 MHz" - so in theory you need 5x the bandwidth of your highest range signal, so you could only measure with one of these up to about 200 KHz.

For about $4-500.00 USD you could get a 100 MHz 2-channel DSO brand-new. If you look carefully, you could get a used scope (may or may not be digital or DSO, though) for around $200.00 (but beware - only purchase if you know how to test out such a scope and you can test the scope out yourself, in person - or if you buy it from a re-certification seller that guarantees the performance).

In the last 9 months, I have purchased two different used scopes, one analog (Tektronix 2213 - 2 channel, 60 MHz), one a combination analog/digital DSO scope (Fluke Combiscope, 2 channel - 100 MHz) - both name-brand, both calibrated, and I have spent less than $400.00 total on both (maybe I should've taken my own advice, but then again you're not going to find a Fluke or Textronix DSO scope new for $400.00).

These pocket scopes are "fun toys", and probably have some use for the "field bench" (although there are much better "pocket" DSOs out there if you are willing to spend the money), but if you think you'll need something more serious and can wait - save your money.

 smiley
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They're quite useful for auto purposes, I managed to sort my injector timing with one smiley-wink
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They're quite useful for auto purposes, I managed to sort my injector timing with one
 

That's actually a great use; it would be a hassle to use a full size oscilloscope on such a project. My Tek is on a wheeled stand, so in theory I could do it, but I would need to also get extended leads and such (and who knows how much those would cost); overall a full oscilloscope could be overkill in an auto project (with the exception of that sometimes you might want two or more channels to compare certain input/output parameters - say a MAF sensor to an oxygen sensor, for instance, perhaps).

One of these pocket scopes, though, is perfect for such a situation; the bandwidth is high enough and what you are sampling is of such a lower frequency that there shouldn't be an issue.

 smiley
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I spoke too soon on the refund.  While DX sent me an Email saying they're refunding my $$ it hasn't happened yet.

CR
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You only ordered on the 25th of Oct?  This is D#X, it wouldnt have been shipped in that time, let alone lost smiley-wink

I spent 15-20k with them last year and only had 1 package go missing which they sent out a replacement of.
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What's your opinion on the PC-based ones, I mean the inexpensive kind, not the multi-thousand dollar rigs smiley-wink

I don't have a scope, and even have been thinking about checking the forums and google for any particularly good microcontroller-based projects.  Seems a natural, so I have always assumed there would be a thousand poor implementations, but few halfway decent ones.

That being said, I've even been tossing around the idea of a basic logic analyzer/oscilloscope design that uses Arduino (easy enough, plenty of inputs, fairly fast) with the TVout library.  I don't know about others, but that lib provides a very low cost, high-complexity display option that most of us have already.. many of my current projects use TVout because portable NTSC displays are readily had from broken portable dvd players, if not the good ole family tv. I would love to be able to flash the boarduino with software making it a logic analyzer/scope when I needed it, and then reflash the chip for other purposes after I was done with the need.  No need to dedicate hardware, except for the amplifier circuitry and such.  Given the settle time of the a/d and all that, I suppose it might not be fast enough for fast signals, but audio and logic ranges ought to be well within sampling range.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2010, 12:38:44 pm by focalist » Logged

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What's your opinion on the PC-based ones, I mean the inexpensive kind, not the multi-thousand dollar rigs


To be honest, I've never tried them; there are some schools of thought that say a scope should be a separate standalone instrument, but most people have a computer on their bench nowadays anyhow...

I have heard a lot of good things about the BitScope (http://www.bitscope.com/) - its fairly inexpensive, has a lot of features, works well with Linux, and to an extent is even "open source" (well, they have the design documents and files for the original bitscope that was published in the past). If I were to buy a PC-based scope, I would lean toward one of those.

There are some PC-based scopes on Ebay and elsewhere, some seem "ok", but they don't have the sampling rates or bandwidth (or other options like the logic analyser) that the BitScope does. Some aren't much better than the handheld DSO already posted.

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I don't have a scope, and even have been thinking about checking the forums and google for any particularly good microcontroller-based projects.  Seems a natural, so I have always assumed there would be a thousand poor implementations, but few halfway decent ones.

Yes, there are a few "halfway-decent" homebrew scopes out there (both PC based and standalone, actually). If you have the parts, and want to try them out, they are certainly worth looking into. Part of the thing to keep in mind is what you want to sample, what you expect your bandwidth needs to be, and what you think they might be in the future. Many of these low-cost, low-bandwidth scopes are perfectly OK for low data-rate applications (checking IR remote outputs, audio signals, servo control signals and the like); but if you intend to attempt to listen in on higher-speed signals (higher-speed RS-232, SPI/I2C, USB, etc) - or you need more data lines to sample (where a logic analyser might be a better deal), then many of these homebrew scopes won't address that.

Quote
That being said, I've even been tossing around the idea of a basic logic analyzer/oscilloscope design that uses Arduino (easy enough, plenty of inputs, fairly fast) with the TVout library.  I don't know about others, but that lib provides a very low cost, high-complexity display option that most of us have already.. many of my current projects use TVout because portable NTSC displays are readily had from broken portable dvd players, if not the good ole family tv. I would love to be able to flash the boarduino with software making it a logic analyzer/scope when I needed it, and then reflash the chip for other purposes after I was done with the need.  No need to dedicate hardware, except for the amplifier circuitry and such.  Given the settle time of the a/d and all that, I suppose it might not be fast enough for fast signals, but audio and logic ranges ought to be well within sampling range.

I say "go for it" - its a project I've thought about myself (too many other things in the way right now, though) - although I was thinking about doing it with a GLCD instead of the TVOut - but either should be OK. You're right that the data rate isn't going to be very fast; your bandwidth is going to be very low (you won't even be able to get much audio bandwidth, actually!) - but for many purposes it may work out just fine.

There's also this kit:

http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/digital-storage-oscilloscope-with-panels-p-514.html?cPath=104_108

Another option, if your only needing logic level signals or a logic analyser:

http://dangerousprototypes.com/docs/Open_Bench_Logic_Sniffer

That's another thing - if you care more about the logic-level transitions, rather than waveform shape (or square-wave waveforms), then a logic analyser might be a good deal. Actually, when you need it - having both (and it can even be handy as a single tool, like the BitScope - which is something I like about it) can be something useful...

 smiley
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