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Topic: Measuring current above 10A (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

dhenry

Typically with manganin resistors (<10mohm), and usually done on the high side, with a current sensing amplifier.

JimboZA

I've noticed many makes and models of dmms have a 10A measurement... what's so special about 10A that it became a sort of standard?
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retrolefty


I've noticed many makes and models of dmms have a 10A measurement... what's so special about 10A that it became a sort of standard?


Well maybe the fast acting protection fuses used are limited in selections to 10 amps or less. Maybe the standard meter leads are only good for 10 amps before their voltage drop would effect the measurement accuracy too much. Maybe because 10 amps is a lot already and more should use special purpose meters?

Lefty

DirtBiker

#8
Jan 04, 2013, 08:23 pm Last Edit: Jan 04, 2013, 08:25 pm by DirtBiker Reason: 1

I've noticed many makes and models of dmms have a 10A measurement... what's so special about 10A that it became a sort of standard?


Maybe because that's what Simpson Electric put int their multi-meters back 50 years ago (probably for the reasons mentioned by retrolefty) and everyone just went along for the ride. :.

Edit:  I just googled them and you can still get a Simpson 260!  Cool!  Best darn analog meter ever!
Dirt Biker

KeithRB

Could be too that the standard banana jack/plug can only handle 10 A before it welds itself.

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