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Topic: Arduino Mega 2560 R3 vs. Uno R3 for beginners {Raspberry Pi} (Read 14 times) previous topic - next topic

AMirza

Well I just got the Raspberry Pi a few days ago and am thinking about purchasing an Arduino to hook up to it. I am a complete beginner and am still learning about these topics.

I was just wondering what would be good for beginners, the Uno R3 or the 2560. The 2560 is only $5 more on this website: http://www.fasttech.com/products/1008/10000015/1101400

Which would be good for me? I don't mind spending an extra $5 if it will be a good long term investment, but in terms of simplicity, Raspberry Pi connectivity, etc. which should I buy?

And if you could also let me know what components are required, that would be great. It comes with a USB cable. I am also ordering a breadboard and various resistors/jumper wires/the whole deal that I should be able to use with the Raspberry Pi alone but also the Arudino.

Any help is appreciated, thanks in advance.

JD3

First off that board is a Chinese copy not a real Arduino.

First clue - it's $15.  Second, its a picture of the real Arduino Mega but the "Made in Italy" in the upper left corner is blocked out.

You might have a lot of problems with the fake Arduino, and some people here despise them.

As for the Mega vs. Uno, it depends what you are going to use it for.
If you want to learn basic electronics, how to let smoke out of components, the Uno is great.

The Mega has more "horsepower" under the hood, is larger and has many more digital and analog pins.
If you are only connecting a few sensor or components up the Uno is a better choice.

Also, if you connect something wrong and fry the main chip, it is easily replace with the Uno.
On the Mega you will be learning how to remove surface mounted ICs, reflow soldering, etc.

My main advice is buy the Arduino from a reputable dealer, such as Sparkfun or Adafruit.
You will be getting the real deal and supporting the inventors, not the copiers.
That little black caterpillar you just stepped on will set you back a few bucks....

AMirza

#2
Jan 05, 2013, 03:31 am Last Edit: Jan 05, 2013, 03:55 am by AMirza Reason: 1

First off that board is a Chinese copy not a real Arduino.

First clue - it's $15.  Second, its a picture of the real Arduino Mega but the "Made in Italy" in the upper left corner is blocked out.

You might have a lot of problems with the fake Arduino, and some people here despise them.

As for the Mega vs. Uno, it depends what you are going to use it for.
If you want to learn basic electronics, how to let smoke out of components, the Uno is great.

The Mega has more "horsepower" under the hood, is larger and has many more digital and analog pins.
If you are only connecting a few sensor or components up the Uno is a better choice.

Also, if you connect something wrong and fry the main chip, it is easily replace with the Uno.
On the Mega you will be learning how to remove surface mounted ICs, reflow soldering, etc.

My main advice is buy the Arduino from a reputable dealer, such as Sparkfun or Adafruit.
You will be getting the real deal and supporting the inventors, not the copiers.


I knew it was too good to be true. I didn't know there were fake Arduino's, thanks for letting me know. I have decided to go with the Uno in that case, since I am just starting out.

What about Amazon? It seems to be about $10 cheaper here, it looks pretty real to me:

http://www.amazon.com/Arduino-Rev-3-Uno-R3/dp/B006H06TVG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1357353028&sr=8-1&keywords=uno+r3

or

http://microcontrollershop.com/product_info.php?products_id=4677

I found it from the official distributor list on the Arduino website, I might just buy it from this microcontrollershop website. No way to confirm the Amazon one really considering it isn't on the official distributors page.

EDIT: Sorry for the newbie question but what is the difference between an Uno R3 and the Duemilanove? They look the same to me and are similarly priced.

JD3

#3
Jan 05, 2013, 04:57 am Last Edit: Jan 05, 2013, 05:00 am by JD3 Reason: 1
The Uno differs from all preceding boards in that it does not use the FTDI USB-to-serial driver chip. Instead, it features the Atmega16U2 (Atmega8U2 up to version R2) programmed as a USB-to-serial converter.  Some people have had problems with this chip, search the forums to find out more.

1.0 pinout: added SDA and SCL pins that are near to the AREF pin and two other new pins placed near to the RESET pin, the IOREF that allow the shields to adapt to the voltage provided from the board. In future, shields will be compatible both with the board that use the AVR, which operate with 5V and with the Arduino Due that operate with 3.3V. The second one is a not connected pin, that is reserved for future purposes.

The bootloader is different, smaller in size and allows sketches to upload faster.

Otherwise the board is the same shape, pins are the same, and the shields are compatible with both.

I am using the Duemilanove, and I bought a new ATMega328P chip and burned the Uno bootloader on it.
Works fine, and my Duemilanove now boots and loads faster.  Just have to select Uno instead of Duemilanove in the Arduino IDE (programming software).

On the bottom of the hardware page was this link, it shows all the past and present versions.
http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Boards
That little black caterpillar you just stepped on will set you back a few bucks....

zoomkat

Quote
You might have a lot of problems with the fake Arduino, and some people here despise them.


I've got a 328 arduino and a mega, both made in china, and both work as expected. What makes you think electronics made in italy are better than electronics made in china? Of all the electronics you own, how many are made italy? How many are made in china? ever own an italian car? I've had good service from the below vendor.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-Funduino-Mega-2560-ATmega2560-16AU-Board-Arduino-compatible-Free-USB-Cable-/251143019741?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a794a5cdd
Consider the daffodil. And while you're doing that, I'll be over here, looking through your stuff.   8)

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