Go Down

Topic: LEDs without the use of current limiting resistors (Read 5 times) previous topic - next topic

retrolefty



Quote
That does not mean that you can't get away with not using that approach occasionally. Using that approach, however for a reliable solution is dangerous.


Right, and the whole point of Arduino is to simplfy things for beginners, no direct port manipulation for example, so lets stick to the basics on the hardware side when newbies are asking if a resistor is required  for an LED.


Now I know what the ugly stepchild feels like.  Lets hide him in the closet when company comes to visit. sigh.

So, the next time someone specifically asks:
"LEDs without the use of current limiting resistors"
And gives a very specific example, we are supposed to tell them that its impossible to do that, and they should never think such dangerous thoughts?


You sir are free to do whatever you wish to your arduino on your projects. However if you post information to people asking for help, some people will probably continue to warn against poor advice that sometimes get posted around here.

So unless your looking for some kind of validation for your methods and advice I don't see where you have a valid complaint to share with us.

Lefty

dhenry

Quote
lets stick to the basics


Essentially you are saying that some members are too stupid to understand the truth so we should tell them falsehood for their own good.

Grumpy_Mike


Quote
lets stick to the basics


Essentially you are saying that some members are too stupid to understand the truth so we should tell them falsehood for their own good.


No we are not saying that and well you know it.

Hippynerd




Quote
That does not mean that you can't get away with not using that approach occasionally. Using that approach, however for a reliable solution is dangerous.


Right, and the whole point of Arduino is to simplfy things for beginners, no direct port manipulation for example, so lets stick to the basics on the hardware side when newbies are asking if a resistor is required  for an LED.


Now I know what the ugly stepchild feels like.  Lets hide him in the closet when company comes to visit. sigh.

So, the next time someone specifically asks:
"LEDs without the use of current limiting resistors"
And gives a very specific example, we are supposed to tell them that its impossible to do that, and they should never think such dangerous thoughts?


You sir are free to do whatever you wish to your arduino on your projects. However if you post information to people asking for help, some people will probably continue to warn against poor advice that sometimes get posted around here.

So unless your looking for some kind of validation for your methods and advice I don't see where you have a valid complaint to share with us.

Lefty

Im not looking for validation here buddy. Answer the question, what are you suppose to tell someone that asks a valid question, and provides a documented example.

I think the best answer to the question is, yes, that is possible under certain circumstances.
It may be that they need the display to fit in a tiny space, but it only needs to work for 3 days and never used again.

Also, I cant take credit for the design, I just found it on the interwebs, and built one. I can only take credit for experimenting with it, talking to people about it.

Sincerly, Danger McGee.

Grumpy_Mike

Quote
Answer the question, what are you suppose to tell someone that asks a valid question, and provides a documented example

You tell them the truth. That it is a crap design made by someone who didn't understand what they were doing or understand the damage it is causing.

You point them at your own web site where you did experiments and prove you are drawing current that is over five times the level that the data sheet says damages the arduino.

In the Internet age on the web documents are not worth the paper they are written on. Which you might say includes my site. So do your own experiment and see for yourself.
If you disagree with the results then publish your findings.

Go Up