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Topic: Time Program (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

AWOL

Quote
The difference in time between seconds on Mars and Earth i

How can an SI constant not be constant (except in cases of extreme relativistic effects)?
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
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Chaul


The difference in time between seconds on Mars and Earth is (Earth 1.0274912510416665 second = Mars 1 second)  :)

Are you talking about theory of relativity or something, since I'm still kinda lost on what that notion means. I guess I should walk away from this topic slowly before further embarassment...

daremick

#22
Jan 08, 2013, 12:50 am Last Edit: Jan 08, 2013, 12:54 am by daremick Reason: 1

Quote
The difference in time between seconds on Mars and Earth i

How can an SI constant not be constant (except in cases of extreme relativistic effects)?



???? What exactly are you asking? SI stands for the international system of units, and nowhere in this topic has it been implied that they aren't constant. In fact the only mention of SI at all is in your post, while simultaneously questioning, I guess, your own post? The reference to the difference in time on Mars and Earth has nothing to do with SI units. One Second will always be one second. The post you quoted (all though you did not quote it entirely) stated;

The difference in time between seconds on Mars and Earth is (Earth 1.0274912510416665 second = Mars 1 second)

Meaning that it takes 1.027 seconds (roughly) for a rotation on earth that would take "1 second" on mars. Mars has a different rotation and orbit than earth does, the same goes with every other planet in the solar system. In order to measure time in the first place early clocks (sundials) were derived that measured when the sun made a shadow on one mark on the dial and when it made a complete circle around to the mark again. This is called a "day", "solar day", or as we know it 24hours. However the earth does not make a complete revolution exactly every 24 hours it is closer to 23hours 56minutes and 4seconds give or take :P so in order to measure a "day" on other planets we measure how long it takes that planet to complete one rotation. For example mercury's "day" lasts about 176 Earth days "solar day" and about 58-59 for a siderial day (one rotation). So as you can see our reference of time, the lovely 24hours is not applicable everywhere in the universe, it's just a unit of measure we derived and it splits the day up nicely. Mars happens to have an extremely similar rotational period however it is slightly over by 39minutes and 35seconds.

So to surmise, no one is contesting SI Units, merely explaining that when you take the 24:39:35 mars day and divvy it up into an earth day you go over a second by .027 seconds (roughly) more. over time this fraction of a number adds up and over the course of days, weeks, months, years, you are taking a shower and getting your pajamas on to go to bed on earth whereas on mars you are in rush hour traffic still trying to get home for the wife's meatloaf dinner. I hope that helped to clear some things up for anyone reading this topic. And I hope it helps to clarify why I hope to complete this small project. Thanks for all the feedback, and positive support I see on here. :)

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