Go Down

Topic: Arduino mini, pro mini power consumption (Read 20 times) previous topic - next topic

dhenry

Quote
around 200 microamps


That actually is fairly high but it is a function of how you want your chip to operate.


CrossRoads

The power LED on the promini consumes power.
I have an 8 MHz promini based remote control that I power via Vcc pin with unregulated 1000mAH LiPo battery.
Has a 434 MHz Tx module with it.
The unit seems to draw ~9mA when not transmitting and jumps to ~15mA when transmitting, measured with a multimeter.
Keep meaning to rebuild it using standalone '328p, never seem to get to it.
Lasts about a month between charges.  Max1811 controls the battery charging from 5V source.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years. Check out the ATMega1284P based Bobuino and other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17.
Arduino for Teens available at Amazon.com.

mark76a

Hi
dhenry, yes 200uA is high. But keep in mind that according to Nick Gammon's "Power saving techniques for microprocessors" post, turning off ADC lowered the consumption "...down from 335 uA to 0.355 uA...".
So 200uA is not the end of the road here.

CrossRoads, among other things, I intend to create a remote also using the 433mhz. How far do you get it to work? Open space or between rooms?
In this link I sent before it's mentioned that without using "ArduinoSleepCode", he also got around 10mA, but after using "ArduinoSleepCode" he got 200uA.
That's my point here. That you can get 200uA and far less consumption, just by using "ArduinoSleepCode" and following Nick Gammon's post.

I almost have all the parts to build a standalone arduino, and maybe get an arduino pro mini.
I think, after reading that link I sent, that with pro mini I'll get very close (if not the same/better) consumption to the standalone aduino 328. very close for me is around +-100uA, and willing to live with 500uA difference to save the trouble of building the standalone arduino. Plus the pro mini is lighter, and that's important to my flying projects.

If anybody experimented with any of this, please reply what you think.

Thanks


solaron99

Hi all,

I have a project that i've completed with the Arduino Uno R3.
I want to purchase and use the Arduino Micro due to its smaller footprint. I've read your comments on the Arduino Mini and Pro Mini regarding their power requirements.

Does the Arduino Micro require a separate 5V regulator for its power source?
Does it have a built in regulator?

And...with the exception of a few more analog and digital I/O pins on the Arduino Micro,
can I expect the exact same functionality as I currently have with the Arduino Uno R3?

Any details will help,

Thanks!
Arduino...addicted

CrossRoads

My remote works at least 50' as that's how big our fencing club is.
Tx & Rx use 17cm of 30 guage wirewrap for antenna.

Arduino Micro:
Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V
Input Voltage (limits) 6-20V

So yes, it has a voltage regulator.

Microcontroller ATmega32u4
So more like a Leonardo than an Uno.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years. Check out the ATMega1284P based Bobuino and other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17.
Arduino for Teens available at Amazon.com.

Go Up