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Topic: Odd sprintf behaviour (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

Krupski


He used Serial.println() to print both. That adds cr/lf.


Yeah, that works, but personally I prefer to use only Serial.print(), then put the "\r\n" in the string if I want a new line. It's easier for me to keep it all straight in my mind.

(actually, I create a "stdin" and "stdout" pointer to the serial device, then use "printf()", but that's a whole 'nuther story!) :)
Gentlemen may prefer Blondes, but Real Men prefer Redheads!

GoForSmoke

Floating Point is slow on non-FPU chips. Why use it if you don't really need it?
And in general, you don't if you can handle fixed-point integers and understand what units are.

Quote
Suppose cTemp is 12.07. What gets put in currTemp?


will this do?
Code: [Select]
sprintf(currTemp, "Current Temp: %0d.%2d C", (int)cTemp, cTemp1);

and yeah, I was waiting and sure he'd spot it. Guess I owe someone a buck.
Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

Krupski


Ultimately, quite possible.  Right now I'm hovering around 29-30K


Well, if you are running out of memory then of course using an extra 1.5K would be a bad thing for sure.

My "slightly sarcastic" comment was really directed to those who write sketches that end up being 9K, then they complain about the extra 1.5K of memory that the floating point code uses and instead use tons of "Serial.print()" calls in series to build up one line that could have been much more easily done with a simply "sprintf()".

The Arduino IDE and programming "language" is certainly wonderful for rank beginners, but it doesn't take long for a user to outgrow the hand-holding and wanting to start writing code the "right way".
Gentlemen may prefer Blondes, but Real Men prefer Redheads!

Krupski


Floating Point is slow on non-FPU chips. Why use it if you don't really need it?
And in general, you don't if you can handle fixed-point integers and understand what units are.


If I want to print something like "Temperature: 20.4 C" using "%4.2f", do I REALLY care about the few extra microseconds the code takes to execute?
Gentlemen may prefer Blondes, but Real Men prefer Redheads!

AWOL

Quote
will this do?
Code:
sprintf(currTemp, "Current Temp: %0d.%2d C", (int)cTemp, cTemp1);

No.  ;)
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

KirAsh4


My "slightly sarcastic" comment was really directed to those who write sketches that end up being 9K, then they complain about the extra 1.5K of memory that the floating point code uses and instead use tons of "Serial.print()" calls in series to build up one line that could have been much more easily done with a simply "sprintf()".

The Arduino IDE and programming "language" is certainly wonderful for rank beginners, but it doesn't take long for a user to outgrow the hand-holding and wanting to start writing code the "right way".


I'm already blowing away the bootloader to reclaim the 2K it takes. :)  But yes, eventually I will rewrite the whole thing.


will this do?
Code: [Select]
sprintf(currTemp, "Current Temp: %0d.%2d C", (int)cTemp, cTemp1);


Based on his example, no that won't.  It will translate 12.07 into 12 and 7, as opposed to 12 and 07.  The end result will be 12.7C instead of 12.07C.  And I'm well aware of that, however, as I pointed out, I know what the incoming temperature reading looks like, it will never have a .0x ...

Now, that doesn't necessarily fix the next conversion, which is computing the F value.  If that ends with a .0x, I could have issues.

Krupski


I'm already blowing away the bootloader to reclaim the 2K it takes. :)  But yes, eventually I will rewrite the whole thing.


You said you were nearing 30K code size which to me implied an Arduino UNO or similar 32K board.

The UNO has a 1/2K (512 byte) bootloader. If you gained 2K by doing away with the bootloader, what board do you have? It sounds like a MEGA2560 (if so, then you have 256K of flash, not 32).

I'm confused.
Gentlemen may prefer Blondes, but Real Men prefer Redheads!

GoForSmoke

It's been a long damned time since I used sprintf regularly and I know there is a format string to put the leading zero in but I guess I'm as lazy as anyone else that didn't look it up. Difference being, none of my code is waiting for it!
Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

KirAsh4


You said you were nearing 30K code size which to me implied an Arduino UNO or similar 32K board.

The UNO has a 1/2K (512 byte) bootloader. If you gained 2K by doing away with the bootloader, what board do you have? It sounds like a MEGA2560 (if so, then you have 256K of flash, not 32).


Yeah sorry, no.  I'm still used to the old bootloaders taking up 2K worth of space.  You're right, it's just that 512 space.  I'm not using any specific board, I'm designing my own based on the 328p.

Either way, the end result of all of this is that a) for now, using the method I choose works for the time being, and b) once I rewrite it all and optimize it, I may very well have plenty of room to add floating point support (and watch 1.5K magically fly away.)

majenko




Can anyone explain to me why it appears that the 'currTime' variable gets tacked onto the end of the 'currDate' one?  If I just output 'currDate', I get:
Code: [Select]
Current Date: 2013/01/13Current Time: 23:32:27

Why's that?


You need to have cr/lf sequences in your sprintf format strings. Example:

Code: [Select]
sprintf(buffer, "Hello, my name is %s", "Roger");
Serial.print(buffer);
sprintf(buffer, "I am %d years old", 56);
Serial.print(buffer);


...produces:

[font=monospace]Hello, my name is RogerI am 56 years old[/font]

However, this:

Code: [Select]
sprintf(buffer, "Hello, my name is %s\r\n", "Roger");
Serial.print(buffer);
sprintf(buffer, "I am %d years old\r\n", 56);
Serial.print(buffer);


...produces:

[font=monospace]Hello, my name is Roger
I am 56 years old[/font]


The "\r" is a "return" (carriage return - 0x0D or 13 decimal) and "\n" is a "newline" (moves to the next line - 0x0A or 10 decimal).


Nope, about 23 foot wide of the mark.

See my answer just before yours:

Quote

The first sprintf is placing the data in the first array fine, but the terminating null character is ending up as the first character of the second array.  The second sprintf is then overwriting that null character.

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