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Topic: Artificial Intelligence??? (Read 4465 times) previous topic - next topic

jagatia

Ok, so i was think, it may take a big big while. but artificial intelligence, or false artiicial intelligence is not Impossible.

But, i wonder, would "learning new things" be able to work with arduino? as im sure internal storage data is limited.
How about storing data to a USB stick?
would that work?

CrossRoads

USB stick, not directly no, Arduino is not set up as USB host.
Maybe with USB 1.1 Host shield (search Sparkfun for an example).
Or maybe store to SD card. Lot of SD shields around with various functions attached.  Or shields with serial SRAM, EEPROM, FLASH

Or maybe use an arduino-based variant (ATMega1284P) with lots of memory and 2 serial ports, and an SD Card (SD and/or microSD) and RTC and battery backup:


(waiting for first PCBs to arrive to check things out!)
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

cr0sh


Ok, so i was think, it may take a big big while. but artificial intelligence, or false artiicial intelligence is not Impossible.

But, i wonder, would "learning new things" be able to work with arduino? as im sure internal storage data is limited.
How about storing data to a USB stick?
would that work?


If you want to have any shot of doing it on a 328-based Arduino (or a better shot on a Mega) - try to find copies of these books by David L. Heiserman:

phoenixgarage.org - Robot Intelligence: An Interview With A Pioneer

That's a link to my site where I did a small interview with him; his books and the ideas within are an interesting starting point for this kind of work. For one, it's a methodology that is fairly simple to implement, yet yields very complex behaviors (even simulated). Secondly, I don't know that much research was done using his systems, so it might be an interesting niche to play around in, that might yield some useful surprises. Third, because these books were mainly written in an era where home computers were slower than the Arduino (much slower) and tended to have around as much memory (although it wasn't a modified Harvard architecture like the Arduino - so there is that limitation) - it should be possible to implement the algorithms on an Arduino in some manner.

With that said - you'll be fighting against a couple of things: RAM limitations (though a Mega would get around this mostly - and perhaps an SD card memory storage could be used for some things), and the fact that the programs listed in those books are either in a variant of assembler (for whichever processor du jour each book uses - likely a 6800 or 8000-series, or possibly a Zilog Z-80) - or in an old form of BASIC (no indentation, GOTOs everywhere, spaghetti code heaven). Wrangle your way past these obstacles, though - and you could potentially create something mighty interesting!

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

robtillaart


I allway think of this quote when I read the words artificial intelligence

Quote
Real stupidity beats artificial intelligence every time.
    Terry Pratchett, Hogfather


That said, given the resources of the Arduino you cannot expect too much intelligence, but as intelligence comes in different forms there is definitely a lot possible. In a sense every sketch is artificial intelligence to some level. But a static one and you are looking for the adaptive ones.

In the category Neural nets there are several articles/posts on the forum. e.g. check - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCDU8mMcU5I -

Can you tell more about your goal, the application, the events need to be handled what the learning will be about?

Rob
Rob Tillaart

Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -
(Please do not PM for private consultancy)

mbackus

If you consider maze solving a form of artificial intelligence, then here's a link to curriculum I've developed describing how to build and program an Arduino controlled robot to get through a maze: http://www.udemy.com/nanomouse. I also have a support page for this project at http://sites.google.com/site/mbbackus.

CrossRoads

Why are you responding to a 3 year old topic? Better to start a new one I would think.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

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