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Author Topic: first pcb try  (Read 6845 times)
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I've one doubt,
according to the schematics
,
will the 5 pin header (in the left) behaviour like this ?
 

because those 5 pins are to connect the CP2102 usb to serial with dtr line, so i can upload sketches without needing to press reset.
Will my schematics behaviour like the second one ?
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Hi, I have some questions.

I will try to build a breakout board for micro sd card (I know they exists but I want to build one myself, not ordering).
My plan is to attach a sd socket, tiny transistors and then in the end drill some holes so you could use jumper wires to attach the whole circuit board to your existing project. I will try to stick with surface soldering so the board could be very small and I don't have to drill so much holes.

I was wondering if it's possible to make a pcb that have that small lines? Don't know what the "lines" are called but will the iron chloride remove those or will they stay?

Tldr; How small and precious could you be when using the iron chloride method?
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BHZ, MG, Brazil
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Hi, I have some questions.

I will try to build a breakout board for micro sd card (I know they exists but I want to build one myself, not ordering).
My plan is to attach a sd socket, tiny transistors and then in the end drill some holes so you could use jumper wires to attach the whole circuit board to your existing project. I will try to stick with surface soldering so the board could be very small and I don't have to drill so much holes.

I was wondering if it's possible to make a pcb that have that small lines? Don't know what the "lines" are called but will the iron chloride remove those or will they stay?

Tldr; How small and precious could you be when using the iron chloride method?

Those lines are called traces.

they can be very, VERY thin, but that are rules to how thin they should be. For digital signals (low voltage, very low current) width isn't much of a factor, but for power signals it is.

Take a look at this "Trace Width Calculator": http://circuitcalculator.com/wordpress/?p=25/

About ferric chloride: it can give very precise results. From my experience, what determines how precise and how thin your traces can be, isn't the etching method, but the trasnfer method. Some transfer methods issue much more precise results than others. I've had good experience with toner transfer, with traces as thin as 8mil, although 99% of the time I keep them wider than 15mil just for safety.



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About ferric chloride: it can give very precise results. From my experience, what determines how precise and how thin your traces can be, isn't the etching method, but the trasnfer method. Some transfer methods issue much more precise results than others. I've had good experience with toner transfer, with traces as thin as 8mil, although 99% of the time I keep them wider than 15mil just for safety.
Thank you so much sir for your answer  smiley

What do you mean with the "transfer method" and what is a "toner transfer" ?
Thank you again for your informative reply,
best regards!

Edit: Never mind I searched for it on google. But what other transfer methods are their?
« Last Edit: April 22, 2013, 11:29:28 am by swescrew » Logged

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Edit: Never mind I searched for it on google. But what other transfer methods are their?

Ok! So by now you know that a transfer method is how you go from the PCB's CAD (computer aided design), from whatever software package you are using, to have it printed on a blank copper board, ready to be etched by whatever method.

Toner transfer is one amog several transfer methods. I like it because I have a good laser printer and it is one of the cheapest of them all. I usually use glossy magazine paper (I prefer to use some of my wife's magazines because they have very thick and glossy paper, which is better for this purpose). I've also resorted to transparencies. Whatever paper/media you use, the method is still: print with a laser printer, using the darkest settings, and then use a very hot clothing iron to transfer the printed image to a black copper board.

Another method is direct printing. Some people have adapted ink jet printers to print the PCB directly to a blank copper board. This is fast and issues excellent results.

Although there are several other methods, the best method - quality-wise - however, is photo-transfer. It takes the longest and is the most expensive, but it also gives you industrial-quality results, or even better. You can have extremely low tolerances with this method.

There are other methods, like special papers, which are simply a variation of the toner transfer methods, but which are more expensive.









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