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Topic: Arduino And Quantum Physics (Read 3090 times) previous topic - next topic

arduinoPi

Is there anyway to use the Arduino in a simple manner to demonstrate quantum physics in any manner?

robtillaart

IIRC Every transistor is a demonstration of QP ;)

What is your audience?
Rob Tillaart

Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -
(Please do not PM for private consultancy)

retrolefty

#2
Jan 23, 2013, 08:38 pm Last Edit: Jan 23, 2013, 08:43 pm by retrolefty Reason: 1

Is there anyway to use the Arduino in a simple manner to demonstrate quantum physics in any manner?


Surely a blink-without-delay sketch with an additional function added to prove of surviving the a it's alive no it's dead roll-over event would give credence to if the cat survived or not?

Lefty

robtillaart


you can arduino use to MODEL a QP effect like "spooky actions at a distance" aka entanglement 

two buttons red and blue and 2 LCD's  - you press one colour and the one LCD says that colour and the other says the other.

Which QP effect do you want to be modelled?
Rob Tillaart

Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -
(Please do not PM for private consultancy)

arduinoPi

how can I test entanglement? 

Grumpy_Mike


how can I test entanglement? 

You can't actually get quantum entailment he was just suggesting you demonstrated.
Is what you are looking for a quantum event that you can measure with an arduino?
If so the look to do an electron spin resonance experiment with it.

dannable


how can I test entanglement? 


Chuck all your hook up wires and jumper cables into a box and give it a shake?  ;)
Beginners guide to using the Seeedstudio SIM900 GPRS/GSM Shield

cjdelphi

Sure...

1.Get the Arduino to release some chemicals that would kill a cat at a random period.
2. stick the cat in the box.
3. wait a few minutes.

Now we have a situation where the cat is neither alive nor dead lol...

wait, is that quantum physics?...

Riva


Sure...

1.Get the Arduino to release some chemicals that would kill a cat at a random period.
2. stick the cat in the box.
3. wait a few minutes.

Now we have a situation where the cat is neither alive nor dead lol...

wait, is that quantum physics?...

Murder or Attempted Murder?

GoForSmoke

Maybe using a green led as a light detector? Red light won't work but green or higher frequency will.

I leave it to you to find out why and decide if that is suitable and how to use it.

Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

Jimmy60

Quote
Chuck all your hook up wires and jumper cables into a box and give it a shake? 


No need to shake it. Everyone knows that you can place neatly wound up wires into a box and they'll tangle themselves over time.

Riva


Quote
Chuck all your hook up wires and jumper cables into a box and give it a shake? 


No need to shake it. Everyone knows that you can place neatly wound up wires into a box and they'll tangle themselves over time.

A good example of Quantum entanglement.  :)

GoForSmoke

Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

Grumpy_Mike

Yes that is an example of the second law of thermodynamics not actually quantum physics.

GoForSmoke

That's why I go with light color and absorption but now that I think of it, colored bulbs are filters so they'd need to be clear plastic and I dunno if you can find those.

Still, different color lights should make different voltages out of a cadmium cell shouldn't they?
Or was it another kind that Einstein used? Sorry, but it's been a long time since school.


Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

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