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Topic: LB1641: Bidirectional Motor Driver with Brake (Read 997 times) previous topic - next topic

RWSDev

Just thought I'd share some info in case anyone else needs it.  I searched google and couldn't find it so after figuring this out, I thought I'd post it here.

Sony CD-ROM drives obviously have have motors we can repurpose for whatever, however I needed a bidirectional motor control and was able to isolate the driver IC on the board.  It is a LB1641.

Here is a link to the datasheet. http://www.onsemi.com/pub_link/Collateral/LB1641-D.PDF

I was able to quickly get this working with my Arduino so if anyone has any questions feel free to ask.

Also, if this information is posted elsewhere forgive the oversight ... I couldn't find it :)

Jason
Come see what we're doing: http://rwsdev.net

capcaunu

Hi, Actually I'm having issues with that exact IC. I think I'm doing everything by the book (well, PDF).
Please see the attachment for all the details.

Can you suggest anything?
Thank you!

RWSDev

Ok ... looking at your image (and this is off the top of my head so be warned), get rid of the cap between pins 2 & 10, remove connection between 3 & 9 (just leave them dead pins unless you have a reason to short them), remove resistor on powerline and run 1 12v line to pins 7 & 8 they can share the power line, if you are controlling this with arduino set pin 5 to HIGH and 6 to LOW and reverse that for spinning the other direction. I don't? have any resistors or caps in my setup with lb1641 ... and get rid of the diode? on pin 4.
Come see what we're doing: http://rwsdev.net

RWSDev

Here is my setup that is working. Just set PIN 2 to HIGH and 3 to LOW for one direction and reverse them for the other direction.

Come see what we're doing: http://rwsdev.net

capcaunu

Ha, works. It wasn't the diode, it wasn't the capacitor, it was my power supply. I used an old printer power supply that outputs 32V, and a LM317 that gets that down to 12V.
I swapped that for a 12V industrial power supply and now everything works and the world makes sense again. The Capacitor reduces noise, and the diode controls how much current flows through the IC, just like the manual says.
Your diagram with the 9V battery made me think.... It was the only thing that was different about your setup. Apart from that, everything was identical and mine didn't work.

Good progress for today! Thank you so much!

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