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Topic: Small power source for one century (Read 7277 times) previous topic - next topic

DirtBiker


The Americas have been occupied for tens of thousands of years.  Check your facts.

Tim


I said predominant culture.  Check what I wrote, and check your attitude.
Dirt Biker

SirNickity

To be fair, a lot American houses are made out of wood.

Maybe it's time we let the "free-thinking" young upstarts in on the secret of the Imperial British brick.


Sure, sure... but the shipping would be atrocious!   XD

0AlphaOmega


To be fair, a lot American houses are made out of wood.

Maybe it's time we let the "free-thinking" young upstarts in on the secret of the Imperial British brick.


Sure, sure... but the shipping would be atrocious!   XD

We could sell you the technology...
For whom does the clock pulse? It pulses for you!

SirNickity

We could sell you the technology...


America's kinda strapped for cash right now.  Would you consider a payment plan?  Perhaps licensing royalties instead?  I hear you're a fan of royalty over there.

0AlphaOmega

#64
Jan 30, 2013, 11:15 pm Last Edit: Jan 30, 2013, 11:18 pm by 0AlphaOmega Reason: 1
Clearly SirNickity, judging buy your name, a bit of a queen hugger yourself.
This is purely between the two of us, so keep it quiet, but the patent on the mud brick has expired, so licensing may pose problems, although her Maj is quite keen that you pay something, she say's you've already had Light Bulbs & Jet Engines for free (actually she had quite a long list but I distracted her by telling her that one of the Corgi's had managed to get out and was humping a guards leg). Although, she did say, as a sweeter, that she'd be happy to have you as subjects again providing you get out the tea-pots, quid pro quo and all that. I suppose you could translate it as Bricks & Tea offor Tax & Coolness. Oh, and I suggested that you get the ginger tosser back.... for free.
For whom does the clock pulse? It pulses for you!

arduinoadrian

I have been thinking in somekind of thermoelectric geneator for years that maybe can be used for this... There is a temp difference from the surface  down as you dig a hole. Maybe placing some bi-metal rods can havest some of the energy from the difference and it will be electrical energy already. If you go all CMOS and sleeping mode most of the time maybe you can use that energy to recharge something while sleeping or have two sets of batteies... Problem will be corrosion... but what if the rods are protected with vinyl or something like ceramic painting (like ovens)?. Maybe they produce enough power to supply the thing without a storage device. Remember spacecrafts use thermopiles (with a nuclear capsule for heating) to generate  electricity. You don't need that much energy so you don't need the reactor. Multiple rods in parallel and series (like batteies) may meet both voltage and current requierements even with small differences in temp. Maybe... Testing is the poblem.
I also think semiconductors should last that long specially because there will be negligible amounts of heat generated.
Perseverance is 90% of the solution. The remaining 10% is more perseverance.

DVDdoug

#66
Jan 31, 2013, 03:09 am Last Edit: Jan 31, 2013, 03:13 am by DVDdoug Reason: 1
...a mechanical watch mechanism might be a better bet for the timing - if you can find a power source with sufficient shelf life to wait to be activated.
That's probably the most "practical" idea!    I THINK I've heard of mechanical clocks that only have to be wound once a year.    One hundred of these mechanisims with one triggering another in series could probably work.    And, for the "final action", probably a bigger spring-driven generator.   

You'd have to make sure there's no corrosion and that the lubrication won't dry-out.   

There are ways of generating electrcity with thermal differences, etc.   But you still need to STORE the energy in a battery (or capacitor) to continuously supply the clock.  It's the long-term reliability of the battery (with its nasty corrosive chemistry) that I'm worried about.


Jack Christensen


I THINK I've heard of mechanical clocks that only have to be wound once a year.


Indeed, there are mechanical clocks that never need winding:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmos_clock
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

SirNickity

I have absolutely nothing valuable to add, but this is a cool thread.

Whatever you do, let us know how it turns out, and if whatever you chose worked after 100 years.

arduinoadrian

It's a good project you build your clock; but...
Also build a freezing chamber and I'll volunteer to get frozen to see if your thing pops after 100 yeas or not :D . Don't use the device to tigger my ice melting in case it fails...
Perseverance is 90% of the solution. The remaining 10% is more perseverance.

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