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Hello !

I would like to know how much current does the Arduino consume ? All the inputs will consume something like 50 mA, the 3.3 V power supply will give a few mA and the 5 V power supply will give 10 mA.
Thank you for your help !  smiley

bblanchon
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Quote
All the inputs will consume something like 50 mA
More like uA (microamps)
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Sorry I've made a mistake, I wanted to say all the outputs will consume 50mA.
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Do you mean you will have a load on each pin that draws 50ma?

If that's the case, the Due can't do that. Each pin is only rated for 3 or 15ma, depending on which pin. Also, the total current "output" of the entire Due is 130 ma. Try and draw more than that and you've just toasted your due.

It might help if you explain what load you want the Due to contol. Then someone can offer suggestions on how it can safely be done.
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No, I just mean that the total consumption on output pins will be 50 mA. It will control 4 sonar detectors, 1 bs170 MOSFET with a very low consumption and 1 serial port.
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No, I just mean that the total consumption on output pins will be 50 mA. It will control 4 sonar detectors, 1 bs170 MOSFET with a very low consumption and 1 serial port.

If the Due is anything like the Uno, it will use quite a bit doing absolutely nothing.  The Uno doing noting at 16 MHz uses 61 mA with an 8 volt source.  From there add whatever else you'll be running.

If you want low current draw, try the Teensy 3.0 instead.  Similar specs, much lower current draw, and super teensy and only $19!

Tim
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Sorry I've made a mistake, I wanted to say all the outputs will consume 50mA.
So you're only going to use 2 outputs?  All outputs combined are limited to 130mA.


If the Due is anything like the Uno
Well since the Due is absolutely nothing like the Uno, this is probably a bad comparison.

The chip used on the Due is a completely different architecture running at a different clock rate, based on a board with switching regulators instead of linear regulators.

So no, it is nothing like the Uno.
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If the Due is anything like the Uno, it will use quite a bit doing absolutely nothing.  The Uno doing noting at 16 MHz uses 61 mA with an 8 volt source.  From there add whatever else you'll be running.

True, but it can be forced to idle at much lower current a few different ways. I wondered the same about the UNO not too long ago and was pointed towards this page: http://www.gammon.com.au/forum/?id=11497

However, if the OP is looking to keep the current draw low while operating his program that's a different story.
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If the Due is anything like the Uno
Well since the Due is absolutely nothing like the Uno, this is probably a bad comparison.

The chip used on the Due is a completely different architecture running at a different clock rate, based on a board with switching regulators instead of linear regulators.

So no, it is nothing like the Uno.

Thanks caption obvious!  I'm fully aware that the microcontrollers are different.

What I was talking about was how Arduino designs their boards, not the microcontroller.  Arduinos are not designed to be ultra low power.  That's what I was referring to.  If the Arduino Due (minus the microcontroller) is similar to the Arduino Uno (minus the microcontroller), then expect it to consume lots of power while doing absolutely nothing.  I know they're not the same (even minus the microcontroller) but the design goal of Arduino systems are not low power.

My point is if you want a battery powered system, choosing an Arduino product is probably not the best idea.  The Teensy line is far better for this purpose, and in a size that typically works a lot better in a battery solution.

But, thanks for letting me know that the Due is different than the Uno.  I figured they were IDENTICAL in every way.  smiley-roll

Tim
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Thanks caption obvious!  I'm fully aware that the microcontrollers are different.
Are you sure?  Maybe I misread your initial statement.  "If the Due is anything like the Uno" made it crystal clear you didn't.

What I was talking about was how Arduino designs their boards, not the microcontroller. 
Again, you demonstrated how you didn't know the differences.   At the board level the Due uses switching regulators while the Uno uses linear regulators.   That's fundamentally different.
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I don't think you connected the grounds, Dave.
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Children, please take it somewhere else, the grown-ups want to talk.
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Thanks caption obvious!  I'm fully aware that the microcontrollers are different.
Are you sure?  Maybe I misread your initial statement.  "If the Due is anything like the Uno" made it crystal clear you didn't.

What I was talking about was how Arduino designs their boards, not the microcontroller.  
Again, you demonstrated how you didn't know the differences.   At the board level the Due uses switching regulators while the Uno uses linear regulators.   That's fundamentally different.

You misread my statement as you suggest.

To clarify my point, if you're looking for a low/battery powered platform, the Arduino "shield" boards are not the platforms to work from.  They're also far too large and expensive.  They're great for tinkering by a novice, but not good at all for a real-world solution.  Once you move from a blinking light sketch to a commercial product, you won't have a good use for the Arduino "shield" platforms.  I can name many commercial products based on the ATmega chip, but how many Arduino-based commercial products are there?  I hope that clarifies my statement.

Tim
« Last Edit: February 01, 2013, 02:01:03 pm by teckel » Logged

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