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Author Topic: Beginner needs help choosing the right Battery for arduino project  (Read 518 times)
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 Hello, I am trying to put together a project using an Arduino Nano. I will admit I am a complete beginner to electronics, and have been trying to learn as I go.
 I will be attempting to run four 9g servos , an LCD 16x2 with backpack, HC-SR04 sensor, and maybe a couple of small 5mm LED, and small piezo speaker from the nano.
 I have been reading of the power requirements to run the devices, and am learning of how that some devices obviously require a resistor to be in the circuit such as the LED's. What I really need guidance on, Is what sort of battery would I want to not burn up the project? Also, would I need any sort of regulator device in between the arduino and battery?
 I apologize for my beginners ignorance, and any information Is appreciated.  smiley-surprise
 
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You need to figur out how much current (and at what voltages) each unit/device needs when running. This is not trivial :-)
Then you need to figure out how long tim your setup should be able to run powered from the battery.

Then you can start calculating what battery you need.

You also need to take the total max power dissipation of the Nano into consideration, is it even possible to run all those things of the Nanos voltage regulator ? (i doubt it).
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You need to determine the voltage range of the servos.  You will supply the power
to those directly from the power source ( battery ) rather than through the arduino. Servo
voltage varies from 5 to 6 to 7 volts or more.  A servo rated for 6V will work better
at 6V  than at 5V.

The arduino power input is ideally between 7 and 10 volts.

It depends how long you need the batteries to last.

If you connect 4 x 1.5 volt batteries or  5 x 1.2 voltage batteries in series,  you get 6 V.
You can supply this directly to the servos +V input   and directly to the arduino input plug
where it will be regulated to 5V or 3.3V for the arduino itself.

Another plausible alternative to consider is two LiPo cells in series which is about 7.4 V.
You can get a 6V voltage regulator to supply the servos from this.



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Thank you both for the replies.  The servo's I will be using are rated at 4.8v, and the LCD is 5v. I would like to have a battery that would at least provide about an hours worth of power before needing a recharge.
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If I where to use something as simple as a rechargeable 300mAh Ni-MH 9V Battery, wouldn't I need some sort of regulator between it and the servo's? If so what sort of device would you recommend ?
Again I apologize for my ignorance. Thanks for your information I am learning  smiley-grin
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A small update. I have done some research and it looks like I would need a circuit similar to this setup. http://www.learningaboutelectronics.com/Articles/How-to-connect-a-voltage-regulator-in-a-circuit
 Any advice is appreciated.
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