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Topic: How do you calculate what the voltage will be after a resistor? (Read 854 times) previous topic - next topic

Papa G



We had the Fluke version of the differential voltmeter in my lab at TI in the 60s. I don't think they have changed much in theory since then.


No, most theories change very slowly and rarely if at all over time. Ohm's law is still hanging in there.  ;)


Yep, Ohm's law is not gong to change because it is a definition and by definition, true.  :)

Nick Gammon


Yep, Ohm's law is not gong to change because it is a definition and by definition, true.  :)


Except near the speed of light, eh?

I'm waiting for "Ohm's Law of Relativity".
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

Papa G



Yep, Ohm's law is not gong to change because it is a definition and by definition, true.  :)


Except near the speed of light, eh?

I'm waiting for "Ohm's Law of Relativity".

XD

retrolefty



Yep, Ohm's law is not gong to change because it is a definition and by definition, true.  :)


Except near the speed of light, eh?

I'm waiting for "Ohm's Law of Relativity".


Don't bother waiting. I saw the movie, the cat dies.

Lefty

Nick Gammon

http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

modeller


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