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Topic: Solenoid Artistic Function - Magnet and Glass Tube (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

encryptor

My brother is a glass blower and he mentioned an interesting idea to me, which I believe is similar to a solenoid.  The idea is to seal a glass tube with a magnet inside.  Then wrap the glass tube with a copper wire from end to end.  The copper wire will be spaced so that you can still see into the glass to see that magnet.  On each end of the wire there would be an electrical connection.  Then by reversing the electrical polarity the magnet can be seen floating back and forth.  What is the best approach for flipping polarity and circuit design with the Arduino Uno?  How much voltage and/or current do you think would be required for a 1 foot tube 2 inches wide, with a strong magnet from magnetic key box you'd stick under your car, and copper wire 2 mil thick? :smiley-eek:
peace*&^

PeterH

Not sure that 'floating' is an accurate description since the magnet would be resting on the glass and (hopefully) sliding from end to end as you power the coil.

Impossible to say how much current/voltage the coil will require, partly because the magnetic flux needed to move the magnet is unknown and partly because you can trade off current versus number of turns to produce that flux - the voltage requirements would then be determined by the required current and the resistance of the required number of turns. However, the wire you're mentioning sounds far too thick unless you are planning a coil to take massive current. You would probably be much better off designing it for a few thousand turns of much finer wire, but how many turns, how much current is needed with those turns, and how thick the wire needs to be to support that much current, you will need to find by trial and error.
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encryptor


Not sure that 'floating' is an accurate description since the magnet would be resting on the glass and (hopefully) sliding from end to end as you power the coil.

Impossible to say how much current/voltage the coil will require, partly because the magnetic flux needed to move the magnet is unknown and partly because you can trade off current versus number of turns to produce that flux - the voltage requirements would then be determined by the required current and the resistance of the required number of turns. However, the wire you're mentioning sounds far too thick unless you are planning a coil to take massive current. You would probably be much better off designing it for a few thousand turns of much finer wire, but how many turns, how much current is needed with those turns, and how thick the wire needs to be to support that much current, you will need to find by trial and error.


Ok, very good.  Please explain more about the resistance of the required number of turns in the coil.  I don't quite understand that.  How would you know.  Isn't it dangerous to send electricity across a bare copper wire?
peace*&^

liudr

Not sure if it will work. If you power the solenoid it will suck the magnet in to the middle if you power it the other way, it will try to turn the magnet, not really pushing it to an end. On the other hand, if you only wrap the bottom half with wire, you can use different current to repel the magnet so you may suspend the magnet at different vertical heights.

CrossRoads

Doesn't have to be "bare" copper wire - can be magnet wire, which has  an insulating layer of varnish or equivalent over it.

Google it - lots of choices.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years. Check out the ATMega1284P based Bobuino and other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17.
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