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Topic: Permanent proto shield installation (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

bkenobi

I have a circuit that I've mocked up on a breadboard and am now ready to install it onto the proto shield. This is my first project to use this shield, so I was surprised to see that the shield does not use stackable headers like I thought so there is no open locations to solder to for by digital I/O pins (among others). What is the best practice for using the Adafruit Proto Shield v.5? The only options I see are a bit ugly.

1) Just plug jumpers into the header
2) Solder male header pins to each wire and plug that into the header
3) Solder to the bottom side of the female header or top side of the male header
4) Remove the female header

I think option 4 is the best, but that could potentially be difficult if the pins don't want to release. That could result in damaging the solder pads and surrounding traces. I presume this is a common issue, so I'm hoping it will be a graceful solution.

(Cross posted on Adafruit forum for visibility)

Nick_Pyner

If you actually have the board, I think the first thing to do is put it over the Arduino and check what is going on. It looks like the silk screen printing is wrong  and it will take stackable headers in the normal manner. I see it has fourteen columns of holes while mine has thirteen.  This might not be enough to make any difference, they just use the space a bit better.  At worst it will stack but uses separate male and female headers.

MichaelMeissner

#2
Feb 02, 2013, 05:25 pm Last Edit: Feb 02, 2013, 05:37 pm by MichaelMeissner Reason: 1
Another option is to get a different prototype shield.  I've bought the following:

  • http://www.robotshop.com/productinfo.aspx?pc=RB-Dfr-98&lang=en-US -- I just got this shield, I like it because it has screw terminals to connect the wires.  In my other proto shield, I had the wires coming out of the headers when the shield was moved around.  However, the pads on the board aren't as well laid out like a breadboard.

  • http://arduino-direct.com/sunshop/index.php?l=product_detail&p=93 -- this is the shield, I've used for some time.  It doesn't have a second row of pins, so you have to attach the wires to stackable headers, which if you move the shield around, they can come out.  It has two leds and an extra button on the shield that you can attach to any pin.



Two others that I've thought of include (note, these aren't assembled, you would have to solder the headers to the boards):

bkenobi

It looks to me that the second board is virtually identical to what I have.  It has the same issue with male and female headers taking up all the solder pads for I/O pins. It looks like the last like may be the same header setup.  I like the wing board, but it's a bit large for the enclosure I was planning.

It sounds like the answer is if the shield doesn't work, try again.  If that's the case, I might as well desolder the headers since I'd have to replace it either way.

Nick_Pyner

#4
Feb 03, 2013, 02:50 am Last Edit: Feb 03, 2013, 05:22 am by Nick_Pyner Reason: 1

It has the same issue with male and female headers taking up all the solder pads for I/O pins.

It sounds like the answer is if the shield doesn't work, try again.  If that's the case, I might as well desolder the headers since I'd have to replace it either way.


Are you sure this is the case?  It looks to me like you simply put stackable headers in the outer rows of holes thereby freeing up all the inner holes to solder whatever you like, just like the boards I have, and it is your choice whether you use stackable headers or not. I don't know why the picture shows male and female headers being used to fill up all the holes, but the explanation could be very simple - the board is actually designed to receive plug-in cables, hence all the gnd and 5v points grouped together. I don't think this stops you from using the board the way you want.  

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