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Topic: Will this setup cause a fire? (Read 3 times) previous topic - next topic

tack

#15
Feb 05, 2013, 04:53 pm Last Edit: Feb 05, 2013, 09:08 pm by tack Reason: 1
The cable isn't rated for AC. You'll probably find leakage currents that it's not designed to withstand. This can cause stress in the insulation and ultimately a breakdown.

It's also not rated for current. With such a small CSA conductor you'll have excessive volt drop over a long length and also heating effects in the cable. Heat + PVC insulation = bad. The rating of the insulation will be less when hot and you risk melting it.

Transforming to 12V, rectifying and drawing 7A at the end means your 120V AC RMS current will be in the 0.7A+ region. The exact figures will depend on I2R losses, transformer iron and copper loses and overall efficiency.

Bottom line, No, it's not suitable for mains voltage like you are proposing.

If you need a run like that then use a 3 core cable of 1mm upwards CSA. With current below 2A I'd probably say 1mm-2.5mm flex extension cable would suffice, without consulting tables or doing a calculation. Laying in ducts or trunking will de-rate the cable too.

Nikarus

Im just wondering. Why cat5. Its easy enough for like $30 to get a nice 100ft 12v extension cord that will mroe then run your 12A adaptor way out there.
It's not like you need to be secretive or anything with what your trying to do. Are you like trying to drive the power through an ethernet cable thats already built into a wall or something?

David82

What other cable can carry that kind of power and data while being able to be bought locally in different lengths? Cat5 is very convenient. An extension chord would be good too but it only has 3 wires. I need power, RX, TX, and video signal all on one cable.

retrolefty


What other cable can carry that kind of power and data while being able to be bought locally in different lengths? Cat5 is very convenient. An extension chord would be good too but it only has 3 wires. I need power, RX, TX, and video signal all on one cable.


Part of most national safety codes is that one is not allowed to carry both AC power and DC signals within the same cable assembly, unless it's some specially build cable that is in effect two cables enclosed in one overall cable. This path you seem determined to keep on is with not a good one to pursue.

Lefty

David82

OK. I need AC power, video signal, and RX, TX all on one cable. What cable will do that?

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