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Topic: Agilent has oscilloscopes to 63 GHz /160GS/s. How is that possible? (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

JoeN

What type of technology is used to make such a ($439,824) product?  How do you sample at that rate?  160GS/s implies some sort of clock at 160Ghz.  How is that done?  I don't understand how this can be done at any price the speeds are so otherworldly.
I have only come here seeking knowledge. Things they would not teach me of in college.

BulletMagnet83

Based on EEVblog tear-downs I've watched, I think the answer is "dark sorcery and witchcraft" :D

retrolefty

Well if it can be done, Agilent is a company that could do it. As a spin-off/de-vesture of the old HP instrumentation company they were always among or leading in the state of art of measurement teck.

Lefty

KeithRB

I had an 8 GHz scope a while back, and it is done with 8 bit flash convertors and you use multiple ones and interleave the data. I am sure they have a white paper. For example, if you have 16 convertors, they each need to sample at 10 GS/sec.

JoeN


I had an 8 GHz scope a while back, and it is done with 8 bit flash convertors and you use multiple ones and interleave the data. I am sure they have a white paper. For example, if you have 16 convertors, they each need to sample at 10 GS/sec.


Out of curiosity I have looked at TI/National, Analog, and LT's sites and I think the fastest converter that is available is TI at about 5 Gsps and that is at 7-bit.  The datasheet shows it's actually 4 ADCs embedded in one chip with some clock management.  So maybe you use 32 of those?  But how the heck do you interleave them so that they are sampling at the correct point in time?
I have only come here seeking knowledge. Things they would not teach me of in college.

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