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Topic: Agilent has oscilloscopes to 63 GHz /160GS/s. How is that possible? (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

modeller


What type of technology is used to make such a ($439,824) product?  How do you sample at that rate?  160GS/s implies some sort of clock at 160Ghz.  How is that done?  I don't understand how this can be done at any price the speeds are so otherworldly.


Are you sure you don't mean a spectrum analyzer? I am at Agilent's site now and don't see any scopes like that.

James C4S

Search google for "Agilent G-Rex".  A few documents leaked with my code name.  :(  [G-Rex means Godzilla, but easier to type.]

There are 4 A/Ds sampling at 40Ga/s each.  In front of each A/D is a 33GHz pre-amplifier.  The best way to describe a pre-amplifier for an A/D is that it conditions the incoming signal for the very sensitive sampling hardware.  (It is also where stuff like the attenuators and edge triggering flip-flops are located.)  If you download the Infiniium 90000-X datasheet, you can see a picture of the front-end MCM (multi-chip module).

So that gives them 4 channels around 16GHz and then 2 channels of 33GHz by interleaving 2 of the A/Ds.  That's all real-time and pretty straight forward.

To get to 60GHz+ they use frequency interleaving in front of the pre-amplifiers.  By down-mixing signal content from 33 to 60GHz down to a range of of 0-33GHz they can sample "high frequency" content with their lower frequency A/D.  Once sampled, software DSPs re-mix that content back into the 33 to 60GHz range.  Then DSPs (which is probably just software running on the on-board PC) "stitch" together the native 0-33GHz content with the 33-60GHz content to create a 60GHz+ bandwidth single.

The stitching technique was first used by LeCroy a couple of years ago to boost their 6GHz real-time scopes to 13GHz.
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

oric_dan

Quote
You can make a 100GSample/sec oscilloscope with arduino as well:
1. sync the signal at point A
2. take a S/H sample at t=A+10ps, ADC and  store data (d1)

Ya got me there. I never could get step 2 to work on the PIC. Darn, should have
tried the Arduino .

JoeN



What type of technology is used to make such a ($439,824) product?  How do you sample at that rate?  160GS/s implies some sort of clock at 160Ghz.  How is that done?  I don't understand how this can be done at any price the speeds are so otherworldly.


Are you sure you don't mean a spectrum analyzer? I am at Agilent's site now and don't see any scopes like that.


Scope.  I posted this later in my thread once I realized I was witholding information:

http://www.home.agilent.com/en/pd-2108888-pn-DSAX96204Q/infiniium-high-performance-oscilloscope-63-ghz?nid=-33202.1010838&cc=US&lc=eng
I have only come here seeking knowledge. Things they would not teach me of in college.

retrolefty




What type of technology is used to make such a ($439,824) product?  How do you sample at that rate?  160GS/s implies some sort of clock at 160Ghz.  How is that done?  I don't understand how this can be done at any price the speeds are so otherworldly.


Are you sure you don't mean a spectrum analyzer? I am at Agilent's site now and don't see any scopes like that.


Scope.  I posted this later in my thread once I realized I was witholding information:

http://www.home.agilent.com/en/pd-2108888-pn-DSAX96204Q/infiniium-high-performance-oscilloscope-63-ghz?nid=-33202.1010838&cc=US&lc=eng


Oh, and lets not forget the all important option sheet for this scope, wouldn't want anyone to be disappointed by buying just the cheap 'base line' unit. HP.Agilent was/is always big into options for their equipment, worst then buying a car.

http://www.home.agilent.com/en/pd-2108888-pn-DSAX96204Q/infiniium-high-performance-oscilloscope-63-ghz?nid=-33202.1010838&cc=US&lc=eng

Lefty

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