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Topic: Need to power small dc motor car for specific distance and stop (Read 4 times) previous topic - next topic

JimboZA


Quote
I have a G&T class

I'm guessing that's not "gin and tonic"?


.... that's in the Staff Room, not the Class Room
Roy from ITCrowd: Have you tried turning it off an on again?
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GrisGris

#6
Feb 08, 2013, 07:42 pm Last Edit: Feb 08, 2013, 07:44 pm by GrisGris Reason: 1
Thanks for the input so far. To answer a few questions. The device is an Uno. G&T = Gifted and Talented. The kids are mostly 5th graders that were recommended for the program by their teachers. They are doing this for a Destination Imagination competition. I'm writing on their behalf because of our districts restrictions on the use of social media at school.
We don't meet again until next week so hopefully there will be lots of suggestions for them to try. In the mean time I plan to pick up whatever relay or transistors we need over the weekend. I think we will try the timer config first because it was their idea and seems simpler to start out. Then if time allows we'll look at more precise options.

Thanks again, all suggestions are appreciated.
FT DI Team

Shpaget

Why don't you ask the kids to come up with ways to measure the distance traveled?
Serving them the answer sounds more "gifted" than "talented".

Then ask them to write the algorithm. Not the actual code, but what happens when and what is triggered in which condition.
When you have that writing the actual code, in this situation, is a breeze.
Make them compete against each other to see who can come up with the simplest method and way for each part of the problem.

Krodal

Shpaget, perhaps the kids are using the internet during the weekend and reading this. I can think of ten ways to drive a toy car a certain distance. Let them come up with twenty ways.

GrisGris


Why don't you ask the kids to come up with ways to measure the distance traveled?
Serving them the answer sounds more "gifted" than "talented".

Then ask them to write the algorithm. Not the actual code, but what happens when and what is triggered in which condition.
When you have that writing the actual code, in this situation, is a breeze.
Make them compete against each other to see who can come up with the simplest method and way for each part of the problem.


That's what we did and the timer idea was the most realistic and attainable in the short run.
These are 5th graders. They have lots of ideas but some of them involve anti gravity.
At this level they pretty much need to read and follow directions.
They searched this forum and others but did not find anything that could readily adapt.
So concrete numbers are more useful than theory for now.

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