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Author Topic: What is the Best and Free C++ Compiler for Windows(Among other Questions)  (Read 3541 times)
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Hello and thanks a lot! I'm relatively new to programming and stumbled upon a little problem: apparently, Java does not support (or at least is not good for) serial communication.
As a result, I am forced to learn C++ because it apparently has a class built to handle serial communication.

Now, before everyone gets mad, I am really really sorry. I did do research but still have questions:
1. There are a lot of C++ compilers. What is the difference between them (other than their IDEs and that they may be built for different platforms. That is to say... do they interpret parts of the language differently or have different libraries etc?) Is there a standard that professionals use?
2. Should I Get a compiler that comes with its own IDE or use netbeans as the IDE (because netbeans is an industry standard -- at least for Java). Is it disadvantageous to not use a compiler's given IDE (assuming it comes with one).
3. What is the best and free C++ Compiler? -- This question actually got answered tons of times online. I already have an idea but I welcome your guy's opinion.


Thanks a ton!

Edit: Relating to question 1, if compilers truly do differ, which is best for Serial communication?

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There are numerous free C++ compilers and none that are definitively best of all. I would say that for personal use the choice of compiler should usually be determined by your choice of IDE. If you use Visual Studio, you'll obviously end up using the Microsoft compiler. If you use Eclipse or one of the other open IDEs you'll probably end up using GCC. But I'd say that choosing an IDE you like is what really matters.
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So compilers should fit the IDE is what you are saying. I wonder why it even matters?
Anyway, then what compiler fits netbeans? That is the IDE I am used to.
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I guess the OP is looking for a C/C++ integrated development environment (IDE) instead of a compiler. GCC is a compiler collection that includes c/c++ compiler. If you want and IDE, google dev C++ from bloodshed. It's free. You CAN use serial in java. Processing has a serial library but it's not straight java.
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Anyway, then what compiler fits netbeans? That is the IDE I am used to.

You are aware that there is a Netbeans C++ bundle available for download.   http://netbeans.org/features/cpp/
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You are aware that there is a Netbeans C++ bundle available for download.   http://netbeans.org/features/cpp/

It doesn't come with a compiler... you need a third-party compiler... hence my question...

Anyway, so what I'm understanding is that really any compiler is good. They are all pretty much the same.
Thanks!
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If you want a compiler, then use the gcc. Dev C++ is bundled with gcc.
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It doesn't come with a compiler... you need a third-party compiler... hence my question...

Yes... but read the release notes:

    NetBeans C/C++ pack has been tested with the following compilers and tools (Windows):
        Cygwin 1.5.21
        Cygwin gcc-core (C compiler) 3.4.x
        Cygwin gcc-c++ (C++ compiler) 3.4.x
        Cygwin gdb (GNU Debugger) 6.5.50
        Cygwin make 3.80

http://netbeans.org/community/releases/60/cpp-setup-instructions.html

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I use Netbeans for Java and C++ and it works OK.

Setting up for the C++ is quite a hassle,   you have to install the Cygwin system on your computer
which may or may not cause difficulties.    Once you have done this,  there are at least 2 c++
compilers which you can use.

Otherwise,  I would suggest Visual Studio,  for which there is a free version,  or at least there
was about a year ago when I installed it.

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Kind of a different direction, but MS VisualStudio also has a free C# compiler for .Net which might be closer to Java for you.
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Otherwise,  I would suggest Visual Studio,  for which there is a free version,  or at least there
was about a year ago when I installed it.

It's still free but after 30 days you have to register for a license ID.  It is not bad and the VS2012 has part of C++11 implemented.
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