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Topic: using atx power supply with motors (Read 708 times) previous topic - next topic

diendea

I want to use a ATX power supply (from a computer) to supply power to 3 motors 12 volt and 3 volt,  how do i connect the different electric wires (which ground etc.)?

Does anybody have a sketch or drawing about this?

Yot

Hi diendea,

As the answer for your question is quite easy to find with google i give you the keywords to use. If you type
Quote
atx pinout
in google the first links gives you what you want.

If you've connected your power supply to the motors you have to connect the /PS_ON (green) and ground (black) wire to switch on the supply.

Good luck,

Jeroen

pluggy

Further complicated by many modern power supplies have lower current limits on the 12v line.  They may decide not to bother starting up at all if there isn't a sufficient load on 12v.  Often a problem on 'green' PCs that don't use much electricity.  
http://pluggy.is-a-geek.com/index.html

Grumpy_Mike

#3
Nov 09, 2009, 10:58 pm Last Edit: Nov 09, 2009, 11:18 pm by Grumpy_Mike Reason: 1
Please don't cross post it dilutes the advice you receive and cheats those just lurking.

http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1257793337/1#1

CaptainObvious

Truthfully, if you're asking how to hook it up.. I don't think it's in your best interest to try it.  Often the computer power supplies have a LOT of amps.. 10, 15.. sometimes 20 amps from a supply... which could be lethal..

Also, if you do venture into the unknown, make sure it's either unplugged for a few days to a week, or  you ground out all the capacitors, so they don't hold their charge.

But regardless, I always suggest experimenting with less lethal supplies before trying computer supplies..

Fair warning! :)


weirdo557

having "alot of amps" doesnt make much sense. their outputs are so low a voltage that as long as you dont somehow stick electrodes under your skin, the resistance of your skin doesnt allow a significant amount of current pass to hurt you. now if you open it, there is higher voltages which can overcome that resistance and hurt you. as long as you dont open it you should be fine.

Grumpy_Mike

Quote
having "alot of amps" doesnt make much sense.


I think you are missing the point, the high current capability is not a problem of safety.

The problem comes if you make a mistake and get a short circuit or something that draws excess current. Normally the supply would collapse or the over current protection would kick in. With a high current supply you start melting tracks and causing fires when you make mistakes.  

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