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I thought this would be a FAQ, but I can't find the answer anywhere. I have an application which needs to run 1 year+ on 2xAAA or a CR2032 coin cell. The application spends 99.999% sleeping (requiring only to respond to either internal wake up timer or external interrupt).  Is the Arduino Due suitable for this type of application? When the board is sleeping (internal timer running, responding to external interrupts) what is the current draw?

I've noticed that many similar boards (eg TI's Stellaris Launchpad), which having an MCU capable of this requirement, have power regulators and power LEDs which defeat this mode of operation.

Thanks,
Joe.
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I got an answer to that question here:
http://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/57854/what-is-the-current-draw-of-an-arduino-due-board-when-sleeping

Seems the minimum current draw is in the order of ~5mA which wouldn't make it very suitable for very low power applications.
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From experience with other boards, the low power capability of the MCU is negated by power regulators and power LEDs etc.

This is correct. Arduinos are development boards/prototyping platforms and not specifically designed for low power applications. One common approach is to design a circuit specific to the application. The ATmega328P used in the Uno can easily achieve the 0.1µA specified in the datasheet. I don't have a Due, if I'm reading the right datasheet, the SAM3X8E can get down to 2.5µA. My gut is the ARM processor isn't targeted as strongly towards ultra low-power applications as the 8-bit MCUs, but I'm just talking through my hat. Still, if I didn't need the compute horsepower, I might tend towards an 8-bit device.

A year on a CR2032 may be stretching it, 2xAAA might even be a challenge depending on requirements, other circuitry involved, etc. Is "99.999%" the actual expected number? If it were me, I'd do my homework and make sure I had a very good estimate of the duty cycle.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 08:22:03 am by Jack Christensen » Logged

MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

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The ATMEL SAM3X present on the Due is a Cortex-M3 based device. This means you have some low power modes available: Sleep, Wait and Backup.
These modes are described in the chapter 5.5 of the datasheet. The associated power consumption can be found in chapter 46.3.

I'm pretty sure you would be able to obtain a long life time on battery if you consider the Backup mode.

On what kind of event do you want to wake up your system? External input, internal timer?
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