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Topic: Want to run a vibration motor (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

task

I have been reading the forums to try and figure out how to use a mosfet or transistor to run a motor, but there is just so much that confuses me.  N-gate, p-gate, connect to this, connect to that, turn this one around, no rather use that one and so on and so on.  I think I know less now than when I started the research :)

Can someone please recommend a diagram and parts I can use to run a vibration motor (https://catalog.precisionmicrodrives.com/order-parts/product/324-102-24mm-vibration-motor-12mm-type)

I am working on building laser tag weapons.  The plan is that the weapon will shake when ever the player gets hit.  The player can get hit every 500ms on hard mode.  The battery I will be using is a 6.6V 1.8A 30C battery (http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=22589)

retrolefty


I have been reading the forums to try and figure out how to use a mosfet or transistor to run a motor, but there is just so much that confuses me.  N-gate, p-gate, connect to this, connect to that, turn this one around, no rather use that one and so on and so on.  I think I know less now than when I started the research :)

Can someone please recommend a diagram and parts I can use to run a vibration motor (https://catalog.precisionmicrodrives.com/order-parts/product/324-102-24mm-vibration-motor-12mm-type)

I am working on building laser tag weapons.  The plan is that the weapon will shake when ever the player gets hit.  The player can get hit every 500ms on hard mode.  The battery I will be using is a 6.6V 1.8A 30C battery (http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=22589)


That's a pretty low current motor that will run off the arduino 5V voltage pin. So wire an output pin to a 1K ohm resistor, and the other end of the resistor wires to the base of a 2N2222 transistor. Wire the emitter of the transistor to a arduino ground pin, wire the collector lead to the motor and the other motor lead to the arduino 5V pin. Finally install a diode across the motor's two terminals with cathode end to the 5V side of the motor.
Here is a drawing to show the connections you need to make, but instead of the voltage coming from and external voltage source, it just wires to the arduino 5V pin. Make sense?

Good luck and good hunting.

Lefty

task

This is from the manufacturer

"Yes you will need to use a MOSFET, the Typical Operating Current of the 324-102 is 56 mA and the Maximum Start Current is 170 mA. The motor is likely to draw too much current and damage the controller, the MOSFET will also help protect the controller from EMI issues."

So that is why I was worried

I will read up on a 2N2222 transistor.  I see there are youtube videos

retrolefty


This is from the manufacturer

"Yes you will need to use a MOSFET, the Typical Operating Current of the 324-102 is 56 mA and the Maximum Start Current is 170 mA. The motor is likely to draw too much current and damage the controller, the MOSFET will also help protect the controller from EMI issues."

So that is why I was worried

I will read up on a 2N2222 transistor.  I see there are youtube videos


The actual transistor used, mosfet for npn, is not all that important as it's just being used as a simple on/off switch controlled by an arduino output pin. So any transistor that can handle 5vdc or higher and 60ma or higher could work, which is just about any common transistor. I suggested the 2N2222 because it's commonly available and cheap as anything else.

Lefty

task

I found 3 different 2N222's

http://australia.rs-online.com/web/c/?searchTerm=+2N2222

Which one do you suggest?  I like the 8c one :)

holmes4

Some mosfet's include a diode which is used to deal with back EMF.

Mark

task

What I have been reading is that mosfets seem to be good for applications above 2A and BJT's are used for applications below 2A.  It seems the 2N2222 is a BJT.

Different websites seem to give differing info about noise.  Mosfets seem to produce more noise according to some websites and less according to other.  I will use the RadioBlock (RF module) to transmit when a player is hit.  Not sure if I should worry about the noise level, because the transmission will happen before the motor starts turning.  Also not sure how much noise a brushed motor makes compared to a brushless and then again maybe I don't need to worry about it, because I am planning on transmitting before the motor starts spinning.

MaJiG

Here is a schematic for a 3V motor. A 2n2222 would work fine.  Just ignore the buttons.

retrolefty


Some mosfet's include a diode which is used to deal with back EMF.

Mark


Those are to protect the mosfet device itself. It doesn't however protect anything else that might wire to the motor voltage or ground return. A diode across the motor terminals is always recommended for a single rotation direction DC brushed motor, as that is the source of the counter EMF.

Lefty

task

Ordering the following

Capacitor,Metallized Polypropylene,Axial,Z5U,Axial,20%,50V,100nF
Carbon Resistor, 0.25W ,5%, 4k7
Diode,rectifier,1N4001
Transistor,bipolar,NPN,600mA,40V,TO92,P2N2222A

Sounds about right?

retrolefty


Ordering the following

Capacitor,Metallized Polypropylene,Axial,Z5U,Axial,20%,50V,100nF
Carbon Resistor, 0.25W ,5%, 4k7
Diode,rectifier,1N4001
Transistor,bipolar,NPN,600mA,40V,TO92,P2N2222A

Sounds about right?


I'd feel better with a 1K ohm resistor, Just to make sure the transistor is forced well into saturation.

Lefty

MaJiG

1k is more common and probably OK.  I'm a little conservative.  Sounds good.

task

I changed the order (changed resistor)

Carbon Resistor, 0.5W ,5%, 1k
Capacitor,Metallized Polypropylene,Axial,Z5U,Axial,20%,50V,100nF
Diode,rectifier,1N4001
Transistor,bipolar,NPN,600mA,40V,TO92,P2N2222A

Is this right?

MaJiG


task

Thank you.  Ordered and paid.  Now to get the motor sent.  That will probably take a month from the UK to Australia

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