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Just curious, if anyone has experience with these.  I have one that was prewired and has a dial to set the sensitivity.  Upon first testing I noticed that I was getting a value in the 600's so I turned the dial and I can change that number and it reads around 60 now, and reaches 100+ when I introduce hydrogen.

What is the best way to translate this value to PPM? Do I need to use a PPM meter to compare values with and make a formula?
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I have made a page for those sensors : http://playground.arduino.cc/Main/MQGasSensors
But they are not very accurate, and you have to figure out the ppm for the value yourself.
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Cool thanks lot of good info on that page.  Did not realize there was that many of those sensors too.  The Carbon monoxide and natural gas ones could also be handy around the house.

I think what I will do is subject it to hydrogen and take note of values, then try to ignite it (with sensor removed).  Once I get ignition then I have a scale to go by.  Are the numbers fairly consistent, or can it change with room temp and other factors?  My test method produces oxygen too if that matters.  (electrolysis)
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After the burn-in time, they are reasonably stable.
But still for just one type of gas and indoors and for a certain air humidity.

I can't find in the datasheet how sensitive the MQ-8 is to oxygen. You have to test that.
Perhaps you need also an oxygen sensor : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxygen_sensor
It seems that a galvanic oxygen sensor is used for simple measurements and a lambda oxygen sensor is used in cars.

The MQ-8 sensor uses 5V for the heat element. The sensor could get 50 or 60 degrees celsius (the metal on the outside). That should be avoided. Ask anyone who works at a natural-gas processing plant, they might freak out.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 04:30:42 am by Krodal » Logged

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