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Topic: Arduino based Stereo Canon DSLR Interval Trigger (Read 3 times) previous topic - next topic

NNC1

I am trying to build a 2 camera Canon DSLR Trigger that will trigger both cameras instantaneously at a regular interval. I don't know which cameras will be used as this point but since they all follow the same sync the conductor standard, it really doesn't matter for now.
I have adapted the schematic from: http://www.paulodowd.com/2013/02/arduino-remote-trigger-for-dslr-stop.html
I plan to use a Adruino Uno Rev3 unless there is a better choice.

However, I unfortunately know almost nothing about circuit design and choosing parts. (Hopefully I can learn something from this project  :))

I have uploaded the schematic I made here:
https://www.circuitlab.com/circuit/9s9x8k/unnamed-circuit/
https://www.circuitlab.com/circuit/9s9x8k/screenshot/1024x768/


I have several questions:

  • Should I change something in the schematic?

  • What parts should I use for relays, optoisolators, etc. ?

  • Can someone help me find these parts on mouser or somewhere?

  • There are 9v power sources in the original schematic. I plan to use a 9v power supply for the arduino. Where do I connect for 9v?



I spent quite some time looking for parts on Mouser only to determine I have no idea what I am looking for.
Your help would be greatly appreciated.

jabbado

#1
Feb 14, 2013, 11:00 pm Last Edit: Feb 14, 2013, 11:02 pm by jabbado Reason: 1
Firstly the diodes D1-D4 are unnecessary. They may even cause problems due to the voltage drop across them. However you should put flyback diodes across the relay coils as explained in the article.

I just checked my 60D and the current that flows through the focus and shutter circuits seems to be less than 100uA. So even some small reed relays will do the job.

Optoisolators aren't really needed here since the relays are isolating your circuitry from the camera.

NNC1


Firstly the diodes D1-D4 are unnecessary. They may even cause problems due to the voltage drop across them. However you should put flyback diodes across the relay coils as explained in the article.

I just checked my 60D and the current that flows through the focus and shutter circuits seems to be less than 100uA. So even some small reed relays will do the job.

Optoisolators aren't really needed here since the relays are isolating your circuitry from the camera.


Thanks for the advice.

Schematic Updated.

Shpaget

Just a practical advice. I would not let the camera focus for each shot because one lens may hunt for focus longer than the other and you most likely won't get simultaneous shots.
Set the focus to manual and you need to trigger only the shutter.

I'm also not too sure about connecting the shutter pins together. I'd avoid it, if for no other reason, than just to keep my mind at ease.
An optocoupler such as 4n35 is sufficient replacement for your relays. My guess is they are cheaper and less bulky, not to mention silent. They can also be driven by the Arduino board so you don't need 9V (battery ground should be connected to Arduino ground).

Veco

#4
Feb 15, 2013, 12:21 pm Last Edit: Feb 15, 2013, 12:24 pm by Veco Reason: 1
I agree relays seem a bit heavy duty for this application. I should think that a simple opto-isolator would be fine for switching. When you get the cameras, i'd imagine they have some current limiting already built in, but give it a quick measure like jabbado did and see if you need a resister in series. That way you can get rid of the 9v supply.
Everything else seems fine.

I'd defiantly go for a solid state solution, any bounce on mechanical components like a relay could make your camera do strange things.

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