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Topic: Road Map and Lifetime of Products? (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

Humancell

Hello,

I'm looking for any information on the "life cycle status" of the various Arduino products.  In looking around, there have been a number of boards that have been discontinued, and made obsolete.  There are also some boards that seem extremely similar in function (M0, M0 Pro, and Zero).

Where can I learn which boards are "current" and "strategic" vs. those that might have a more limited life time?  Is there something that describes which boards might be heading towards the end of their life cycle, vs. others that are more strategic and have a longer life time?

I came across this when looking at the M0, M0 Pro, and Zero, and trying to understand the differences and life time of them.  I'm also curious what others are the most popular selling at this time.

Thoughts?

ballscrewbob

There seems to be a move to the MKR layout and platform.
Its breadboard friendly and does offer some slightly better options.

The UNO and MEGA are still a best seller as can be seen by the amount of clones etc that are quite prolific.

Not really enough detail in your question in terms of what do YOU expect for a lifespan.
If you compare it to major electronics which have quite short spans then most of the boards have exceeded everybody's expectations.

Don't expect an official answer as to what is the best seller and how many as that is not something most manufacturers will state openly or if they do it tends to be exaggerated numbers.

The official blog also give you a hint at direction with the tie in to a newer chip manufacturer.
Worth reading.


It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

SurfingDude

Where can I learn which boards are "current" and "strategic" vs. those that might have a more limited life time?  Is there something that describes which boards might be heading towards the end of their life cycle, vs. others that are more strategic and have a longer life time?
Yes, it's like a zoo and some of the animals are quite older. There is a long history here. This gets more complicated since the production seems to be in batches and between batches there might have been engineering changes due to changing part availability.

Because Arduino is fully open source companies such as SparkFun, Adafruit, and OSEPP can manufacture quality clone products using in some cases yet different support chips. These are supported through the Board Manager and help provide even more choice or confusion.


I came across this when looking at the M0, M0 Pro, and Zero, and trying to understand the differences and life time of them.  I'm also curious what others are the most popular selling at this time.
The Zero and M0 Pro include the Atmel EDBG chip which gives single-step debugging with the Atmel Studio IDE. There are other minor differences between these two boards, again based development history. The M0 is a less expensive version that lacks the 2nd USB port and the EDBG chip. My favorite for development is the Zero with the WiFi101 shield. For deployment these can usually be replaced by the MKR1000.

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