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Topic: mesh network between xbee pro s2b (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

gabys

Oh yeah! I just noticed that the mesh network documentation was written by you Jack. Good work! You are a "mesh network" saver!! XD

Jack Christensen


Oh yeah! I just noticed that the mesh network documentation was written by you Jack. Good work! You are a "mesh network" saver!! XD


And sometimes I'm just a mesh. But glad to help in some small way :D
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

Jack Christensen


I just shut down my coordinator, and sure enough, the other devices kept working.  Then I shut down one of the other devices (a router) and turned it back on, it couldn't connect.  I let it try while I crawled back up into the attic and turned on the coordinator and the disconnected router hooked up in a few seconds.  There was an end device sleeping and waking up the entire time that kept working just fine through the whole episode.  WTF??


Sorry to make you crawl through the attic :smiley-eek:  When you say the router couldn't connect after being turned back on, what was the specific symptom? Are JV or NW set to non-default values?

Quote

...the network doesn't come back up until the coordinator does...


When is the network considered "up"?

Most of my XBees have an "associated" LED, the meaning of which I misinterpreted for some time. What it doesn't mean is that "I am actively connected to a network and can transmit and receive." Consider a two-node network, a coordinator and a router. Configure them and get them talking. Then power both off. Now power up the router only. The "associated" LED will still blink, indicating that the router is still associated to a network, and when it can again connect to that network, it will then be able to transmit and receive.

What the associated LED does mean is more like "I joined a network (coordinator required for that) and nothing has happened to cause me to leave it." It's just an internal status in the individual module that doesn't necessarily reflect the current ability of the device to actually function on the network.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

draythomp

I was sniffing the network and looking for actual transmissions; didn't even bother to look at the lights because they are inside a box.  I have to sniff them because most of them don't broadcast anymore, they have specific addresses to transmit to.  When the coordinator was unplugged, nothing changed except the time transmissions that the coordinator is in charge of.  Then I took down the router, which is an outside sensor for temperature; I popped the GFI it's plugged into.  When I turned on the router, it didn't come back.  I waited quite a while, well many, many commercials on the TV, and it never sent anything.  It's not in the path of any other XBees, so I couldn't tell if it would relay.

Crawled up and turned the coordinator back on and it started working really quickly, then I noticed transmissions from the temperature sensor start up a couple of seconds later.  All the time a couple of battery monitors that are configured as end devices and sleep for around a minute between transmissions were just talking away like they didn't notice anything.

So, it certainly wasn't a scientific test, but it did prove the coordinator can be turned off after the entire network is established.  Don't know about the router, but it was sure silent from the time I turned it off until a second or two after the coordinator came back on.
Trying to keep my house under control http://www.desert-home.com/

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