Go Down

Topic: Programming arduino with other programs (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

PaulS

To paraphrase Henry Ford, you can use any language you want, as long as you want to use C++.

Nick Gammon


I´m learning BASIC for programing AVR chips on school, and I was interested on learning Java too.


Let me give you an analogy ...

Let's say you are planning to visit Russia, and you don't speak Russian. It would be logical to learn Russian, right? But a friend says "why not learn Greek? - some people in Russia speak Greek". Now you could do that, and it would work in a limited sort of way. But learning Russian is smarter, yes?

The fact is that 99% (if not 99.9%) of programs for the Arduino are in C++. That isn't a particularly hard language to learn. Almost all of the libraries, example code, projects, etc. are in C++. That is the "native" programming environment. Yes, I know you can turn Basic into .hex code if you find a compiler, but where would that be?

If you choose to go down the Basic route, you have abandoned most of the examples, help, libraries, etc. that you will get if you stick to the language used by the Arduino IDE. Even the examples in the Atmel datasheet are in C (and machine code).

billroy

It might be worth checking out Bitlash: http://bitlash.net

Bitlash is an interpreter and command shell for a tiny language that runs entirely on Arduino.  It's my take on what a modern beginner's language would look like on a '328-class machine.

Bitlash is easy to learn and teaches good stepping-stone habits for the C++ environment.  You can extend the language by defining functions from the command line, or by integrating Bitlash into your sketch and exposing your C functions to the Bitlash language.

Code and documentation at http://bitlash.net

-br

faurek

Quote
It might be worth checking out Bitlash: http://bitlash.net

Bitlash is an interpreter and command shell for a tiny language that runs entirely on Arduino.  It's my take on what a modern beginner's language would look like on a '328-class machine.

Bitlash is easy to learn and teaches good stepping-stone habits for the C++ environment.  You can extend the language by defining functions from the command line, or by integrating Bitlash into your sketch and exposing your C functions to the Bitlash language.

Code and documentation at http://bitlash.net

-br



I know C++, it was the first thing I learned, but I wanted to use BASIC or JAVA.

Thanks everybody for the answers.

GoForSmoke


I´m learning BASIC for programing AVR chips on school, and I was interested on learning Java too.


Does the school provide or sell BASIC software/IDE/system to program AVR? Because if that's what the school wants then do it!

If they don't then why torture yourself? Inflicting BASIC on anyone is torture even if the UN doesn't recognize the fact.
I find it harder to express logic in English than in Code.
Sometimes an example says more than many times as many words.

Go Up