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Topic: Xbee Series 2 Boot Time (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

Jack Christensen

I'll refer you back to the product manual once again, link above.

Which, BTW, says that the power-down current is < 1µA. If the LEDs on the XBee explorer aren't lit, then they're probably not consuming current. If there is a voltage regulator on the board (if it's powered by 5V then there certainly is), that is probably the culprit. Just as an Arduino is not designed to minimize power consumption, neither is the explorer board.

Another suggestion from the product manual:

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For applications that need to ensure the lowest sleep current, inputs should never be left floating. Use internal
or external pull-up or pull-down resistors, or set the unused I/O lines to outputs.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

Lordono

Thanks.

I'm pretty sure it is the LED as they are lit even on sleep modes to indicate that they are still powered. Do you have a way to operate Xbee with an Arduino which is at 5V? I'm thinking of using resistors to make a level converter, will it work?

I'll refer to the product manual on the pin hibernate. Thanks again. Let me know if you think the resistors or other methods will work. I hope to buy as little as possible and resistors are available to me quite readily. =)


Jack Christensen

#7
Feb 26, 2013, 01:39 pm Last Edit: Feb 26, 2013, 01:42 pm by Jack Christensen Reason: 1

I'm pretty sure it is the LED as they are lit even on sleep modes to indicate that they are still powered.


Must just be a power indicator LED? Guess I was thinking of the RSSI and "associate" LEDs some boards have. For a low power design, obviously the whole lot should be eliminated.

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Do you have a way to operate Xbee with an Arduino which is at 5V?


Yes, but it always involves a separate 3.3V supply for the XBee.

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I'm thinking of using resistors to make a level converter, will it work?


A resistive voltage divider can be used to adjust logic levels, although this would not be my preferred approach. If you mean to use resistors to change the supply voltage, then no, that will absolutely not work.

Top on my list would be to run everything on 3.3V, and a custom circuit (i.e. not using an actual Arduino board) designed for low power consumption.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

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