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Topic: Yup, I may have gotten myself a little over my head... (temperature probes/net.. (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

Retroplayer


I don't know where this work is being done but based on UK employment law, if this development is part of the OP's normal job I would not expect the OP to retain any IPR or commercial rights, unless the employer volunteers them or the employment contract already provides them. It's only when the development is not part of the normal job that you have rights that you might be able to sell to your employer rather than giving them away.


It is the same here in the U.S. Actually, maybe a bit worse. It doesn't matter if it is part of your "normal job" or not, but any works you develop while on company time belongs to company, period. So a kid flipping burgers at Burger Shack for $7 an hour comes up with something that saves the company millions, but does it on his work shift, loses all rights to it. In fact, his name does not even get any credit towards it at all. Generally, companies are not THAT evil as to exploit their employees so badly, but they can be if they chose to be  and the employee isn't careful to come up with a contract before beginning work.

Anyway, I apologize for taking things off-topic. This may be a normal, typical part of the OPs job. But I have seen people screwed over by this in the past, and I have gotten screwed by it too (though nothing as potentially big as this.) 

BTW, what the OP is designing is not really anything new. There are commercial systems that do exactly this. We use them to monitor environmental chambers at my work. However, he is planning to offer a cheaper system. Keep that in mind when negotiating price.

Something like this, for example:
http://www.dataq.com/products/hardware/temperature-alert.html?gclid=CM_EtJO06LUCFaI-MgodQzoAHQ at $299

or even this:
http://avtech.com/Products/Environment_Monitors/Room_Alert_3E.htm

at $145

Oddly, I even have a few sitting right here that were intended for this. I grabbed them as obsolete scrap and I use them as development boards (they have Atmega128s on them mostly pinned out.)

sonnyyu


Something like this, for example:
http://www.dataq.com/products/hardware/temperature-alert.html?gclid=CM_EtJO06LUCFaI-MgodQzoAHQ at $299


Dataq data sheet

From OEM datasheet
Chipset: Atheros AR2315 chipset
Memory: 32MB DRAM, 8MB Flash
Operating System: Open WRT

AR2315 is SoC (system-on-a-chip) has GPIO/High Speed UART but lack I2C/SPI.


I grabbed them as obsolete scrap and I use them as development boards (they have Atmega128s on them mostly pinned out.)


Those Atmega128s might be interface of I2C/SPI to AR2315.

Plan E.  credit by Retroplayer
OEM/ODM  OpenWRT enable router which use SoC  has I2C/SPI interface (no need Atmega128s).

I edit/remove the price.

laadams85

Quote
but any works you develop while on company time belongs to company, period.

Depending on the industry and the contract that you sign it can get worse.  A lot of tech companies will declare anything you develop, on company time or on your own time, is their property.  This can include anything you happen to be developing in your basement.

retrolefty


Quote
but any works you develop while on company time belongs to company, period.

Depending on the industry and the contract that you sign it can get worse.  A lot of tech companies will declare anything you develop, on company time or on your own time, is their property.  This can include anything you happen to be developing in your basement.


That's a rather unusual situation and in the few cases it might apply it would be because even if developed in a developer's basement if it is proved he used proprietary information or knowledge obtained because of his employment through the company, then his basement design may be indeed a violation of the company's IP rights, then they would have a case, otherwise that is a straw man statement that would require specific citations to be believable. I strongly suspect the 'anything'  part is most likely an added addition on your part, if you instead stated 'some things' then it's an believable statement.

Lefty

Retroplayer


... because even if developed in a developer's basement if it is proved he used proprietary information or knowledge obtained because of his employment through the company, then his basement design may be indeed a violation of the company's IP rights,


That's pretty much exactly like it is worded in the contract with my company. I work for an extremely large company that has their hands in many different technologies. So, from my experience your suspicion is correct.

laadams85

It depends on the state you are working in and the contract that you assign.  In most states in the USA the default is that an employer is allowed to take claim of any and all intellectual property of employees if that is what is in their contract.  A few states have made that illegal, California being a good example.
Quote
Any provision in an employment agreement which provides
that an employee shall assign, or offer to assign, any of his or her
rights in an invention to his or her employer shall not apply to an
invention that the employee developed entirely on his or her own time
without using the employer's equipment, supplies, facilities, or
trade secret information except for those inventions that either:
   (1) Relate at the time of conception or reduction to practice of
the invention to the employer's business, or actual or demonstrably
anticipated research or development of the employer; or
   (2) Result from any work performed by the employee for the
employer.
   (b) To the extent a provision in an employment agreement purports
to require an employee to assign an invention otherwise excluded from
being required to be assigned under subdivision (a), the provision
is against the public policy of this state and is unenforceable.


They wouldn't have a law on the books if wasn't legal to own all the IP of your employee.

Columnmn

Geez, I went to bed, and woke up to all these replies. Thanks to everybody taking an interest.

I'm liking the look of the nagios program, I shall have to investigate it more when I get a chance. And I'll have to learn some more about the raspberry pi, I've researched them a little, but not massively.

With getting paid for it, I'm not looking for them to throw money at me. I'm more liking the idea of it on my portfolio, and maybe a bonus at the end of the year if it works well. They are, unrelated to this, putting me through management development courses, mentoring programs, giving recognition through awards and what not.

When a promotion possibilty comes around, the ability to say that I designed and implemented a temp recording system that saves x time, and x money, and x off the insurance company premium will get me well ahead of most other candiates. Well that's my hope anyway.

Retroplayer

I hope it works out for you. It is my experience that few companies hold any loyalty to their employees (especially one with 56000 sites across the globe - you are just a number.) That's just business. Just remember that if they dump you, they keep your technology, and you get nothing.

Columnmn

I'm on pretty good terms with the higher ups in the company, they all know and like me. There are overseas parts, but for a big company, they are pretty people orientated, or at least the appear that way.

Plus if I start demanding money for it, we've got a fair few smart I.T. people who could probably grasp the tech pretty easily.

retrolefty


I'm on pretty good terms with the higher ups in the company, they all know and like me. There are overseas parts, but for a big company, they are pretty people orientated, or at least the appear that way.

Plus if I start demanding money for it, we've got a fair few smart I.T. people who could probably grasp the tech pretty easily.



Don't let some of the negativity effect you. Companies often reward intuitive in their employees ideas and accomplishments, some more then others, some supervisors more then others, but it is never something to be considered a waste of time if it helps your advancement, sense of pride, and self assurance.

Lefty

Graynomad

When I worked for Prime Computers I got a letter from them to the effect that they had no interest in any of my unrelated out of hours design work in general, and specifically a product I was working on that I eventually had on the market.

They were a huge company (RIP) but very good at the people level as well.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

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