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Topic: Arduino Packaging Strategy is Wasting Paper Products (Read 6 times) previous topic - next topic

modeller


I like the packaging strategy. I only need 1 original arduino of each kind, all others can be clones (to leave them inside something, or bare atmegas, so I don't really see the 'harm')


Sorry, but I have no idea at all what that statement has to do with my original point.

... as I was driving home I accidently spilled my Iced tea all over my seat and in one of the RadioShack bags. Thank God the paper packaging was able to hold off the tea long enough for me to pull over and save the boards from the sticky mess. I don't know what I would do if that paper packaging wasn't there to save my ass. Thanks Arduino :)


Paper packaging isn't there to shield electronics from spilled iced tea, that's not what paper is supposed to do. If it did deflect iced tea it was simply a coincidence. A sealed ESD bag would be good at that - but unfortunatly this company doesn't use ESD bags for these products.

The paper packaging for the prootoboard is overdone and I showed a picture of the Arduino Uno packaging to prove this is so. The more complex product, the "core" element" of the system, has the least paper packaging, not even a sealed ESD bag. Jerz, go spill your iced tea on the Arduino box and see how you fare.

So really, both your points are irrelevant to my original idea.


Jerz

#26
Mar 18, 2013, 02:56 am Last Edit: Mar 18, 2013, 03:00 am by Jerz Reason: 1
Dude, just take all this time and energy you obviously have on your hands and make something with the damn box. Shit....
I think someone needs a hug. :smiley-yell:
If it was easy, everyone would do it.

GaryP

You mean, if they would use the ESD bag also, the package would be just perfect?

C'moon, leave the guy alone, he has a point after all.

But all this should be scaled on the real world sized packaking with much too much plastic.

If you install, let's say new IBM PC, you have 3-4 plastic bags for few little parts that you probably won't even use, every piece of "manuals" are in their
own bag, and what are you going to do with them once you have them? Yeah, right to the trash bin.

Plastic is the real problem. But not with the electrical components, with little bag of silicon.

Cheers,
Kari
The only law for me; Ohms Law: U=R*I       P=U*I
Note to self: "Damn! Why don't you just fix it!!!"

modeller


Dude, just take all this time and energy you obviously have on your hands and make something with the damn box. Shit....
I think someone needs a hug. :smiley-yell:


Translation: I have no rational insight to add so I'll chastise the OP. In the forum I operate this would be referred to as "dodging".


You mean, if they would use the ESD bag also, the package would be just perfect?


It would be better for the Arduino device. It's standard practice in the industry - to package electronics in ESD bags. Why does the Arduino team think they know better than the entire industry in this regard?

Quote

C'moon, leave the guy alone, he has a point after all.


Thanks

Quote

But all this should be scaled on the real world sized packaging with much too much plastic.

If you install, let's say new IBM PC, you have 3-4 plastic bags for few little parts that you probably won't even use, every piece of "manuals" are in their
own bag, and what are you going to do with them once you have them? Yeah, right to the trash bin.

Plastic is the real problem. But not with the electrical components, with little bag of silicon.


Of course. The point is, for any packaging, to scale it back.

Look at the pic I attached. See the cardboard support? That comes in various types of boxes to support furniture during shipping. It's made of paper but it's very strong, almost as strong as wood. See the protoboard? If a smaller size of that support product were used, a few small pieces of that were used around the pins of the protoboard so they would be protected, you wouldn't need that big box and the paper volume would be smaller. You could use a smaller box like the Arduino comes in.

Think people think! Don't kill the messenger.

Nick Gammon


It would be better for the Arduino device. It's standard practice in the industry - to package electronics in ESD bags. Why does the Arduino team think they know better than the entire industry in this regard?


My guess is, that since the device is aimed at the hobby market, they expect that the first thing the new owner will do is open it up and hold it in their hands. The ESD bag would just slow that process down slightly. In the absence of warnings about "only use at an ESD-safe workstation", which would go against the whole hobbyist approach, there isn't much point about worrying about ESD.

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