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Author Topic: Power consumption in voltage regulator  (Read 4016 times)
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Hi,

I use LE33cz or LE50cz from ST or others in the product family. They have a idle power consumption of 0,5 ma and low noise. Vin max is 20volt so it will protect your low voltage ic like the "atmega 328" whatever power supply you use.


greetz from holland.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2013, 12:11:41 pm by Campagne » Logged

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I suggest a MAX631, which is a switching regulator, with 80%+ efficiency. Since it is also a step-up regulator, even if the input voltage drops below the output voltage, it can still provide the output.

It requires just 2 external components + a current divider if you want to adjust the output voltage (which is your case, since the MAX631's predefined output is 5V)

I am very found of Maxim's voltage regulators. They have an extremely low dropout voltage.

I often use the MAX604 and MAX603 in my designs.
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I suggest a MAX631, which is a switching regulator, with 80%+ efficiency. Since it is also a step-up regulator, even if the input voltage drops below the output voltage, it can still provide the output.

It requires just 2 external components + a current divider if you want to adjust the output voltage (which is your case, since the MAX631's predefined output is 5V)

I am very found of Maxim's voltage regulators. They have an extremely low dropout voltage.

I often use the MAX604 and MAX603 in my designs.

I think this would be good if the OP was using say 2 or 3AA batteries for the supply, which might be a good idea.  Unfortunately the OP is using 9V, this would be extremely bad news for the load connected to the regulator as the output voltage will be 9V - 1 diode drop.  The OP needs a buck regulator or to change the supply and use this regulator.  I like the idea of 3AA cells though.
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I used to use the MAX1724 (2.7, 3.0, 3.3, 5.0 versions available) step-up DC-DC, 1.5uA quiescent current. Worked from ~0.7V input. Only a single inductor and 2 capacitors are required..  smiley
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