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Topic: From processing to arduino (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

pedroply

Hi today i decided to make an interface between my pc and my arduino uno r3.
The thing is when I am sending only one byte I can use it without problems waldo when I am sending more than one byte like "arduinoPort.write(pos1);" and "arduinoPort.write(pos2);" the values get very unstable like jumping from 90 to 0 or to 130 how could I solve this problem conection?

HazardsMind

Send it as a string using sprintf() and split it back to individual parts with strtok()
My GitHub:
https://github.com/AndrewMascolo?tab=repositories

pedroply

I dont thing I can do that, it says "the function sprintf(int, int) does not exist".

HazardsMind

Quote
sprintf(int, int)
There is a little more needed than that.
Here is my code using sprintf and strtok. You do NOT need the virtualwire library, just look at how they are used and setup.
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,151900.15.html
My GitHub:
https://github.com/AndrewMascolo?tab=repositories

James C4S


Quote
sprintf(int, int)
There is a little more needed than that.

As I understand the original question, pedroply is using Processing.  Processing does not support sprintf().

It really shouldn't be necessary to create an entire string on the sending side anyway.  Just send a delimiter in between the individual values. 
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

pedroply

And how do I split the values into ints on the arduino?

James C4S

First you have to think about what you are sending.

If you are sending ASCII strings, then you'll need to use functions like strtok() and atoi().  Hazard's example link above has receiving code similar to what you would need.

If you are sending "byte" values of what the integers in processing represent, then it is quite a bit easier since you don't have to convert from ASCII to decimal.
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

pedroply

Well I am sending bytes.
And thanks i had forgotten to tell you.

HazardsMind

It is in the receiving code from the link I gave you.

Code: [Select]

// the data to be split "x,y,z,s" => "111,222,333,444"
       x=atoi(strtok(c,",")); // strtok will look at the split point ",", and will return everything before it, so x = 111
       y=atoi(strtok(NULL,",")); // this will continue off from where the first line ended, and will look again for "," and now y = 222
       z=atoi(strtok(NULL,",")); // same here
       s=atoi(strtok(NULL," ")); // this is looking for a space " " again s = 444

//The atoi() function will convert an array of chars {'1','1','1'} into an actual int 111. Here I just combined both functions into one.


added: just read James C4S's post
My GitHub:
https://github.com/AndrewMascolo?tab=repositories

pedroply

I cant get it work:
Code: [Select]
#include <Servo.h>

Servo myservo;



int pos = 0;



void setup()
{
  myservo.attach(9);
  Serial.begin(9600);
 
}

void loop()
{
           
     if (Serial.available() > 0) {
      pos = atoi(strtok(NULL,",")); //how do i use this??
      myservo.write(pos);
 
  }


}

Arrch


pedroply

Still the same I am don't know how to use it in my situation.

Arrch


Still the same I am don't know how to use it in my situation.


Typically it takes more than 15 minutes to read and understand stuff like this; It's always a good idea to setup some examples and play around with them until you have a better understanding.

Regardless, you haven't said anything about how the string that is sent over the Serial line is formatted.

pedroply

In processing it is like this:
Code: [Select]
arduinoPort.write("h");
  arduinoPort.write(",");
  arduinoPort.write(pos);

Arrch


In processing it is like this:
Code: [Select]
arduinoPort.write("h");
  arduinoPort.write(",");
  arduinoPort.write(pos);



Mixing ASCII and binary is rarely a good idea. Pick an encoding scheme and stick to it.

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