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Topic: An Attiny85 I/O Network (Read 3 times) previous topic - next topic

GoForSmoke

You can fit 3 Tiny85's on a single 24-pin socket. Each one can put a lot of attention on something.

But if all you want to do is blink lights the 1 Tiny and a set of shift registers will do for many leds.

I find it harder to express logic in English than in Code.
Sometimes an example says more than many times as many words.

dritchie0042


You can fit 3 Tiny85's on a single 24-pin socket. Each one can put a lot of attention on something.

But if all you want to do is blink lights the 1 Tiny and a set of shift registers will do for many leds.




That is a good idea, but how would you manage the routing of x3 5v regulators on a single sided copper clad board though? That was the real issue.

strykeroz

What was the reason for multiplying the regulators?  How many ATTinies was that to run?
"There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse"
- retired astronaut Chris Hadfield

GoForSmoke



You can fit 3 Tiny85's on a single 24-pin socket. Each one can put a lot of attention on something.

But if all you want to do is blink lights the 1 Tiny and a set of shift registers will do for many leds.




That is a good idea, but how would you manage the routing of x3 5v regulators on a single sided copper clad board though? That was the real issue.


You don't need a separate regulator per chip. If you get a 5V regulated USB charger for power or any other 5V regulated (you can go with less BTW) power supply then you don't need any regulator on board. Just make sure that your supply has enough amps to run your project, those high-bright leds do suck current and IMO it's better to run them off power that doesn't go through the MCU.

3 on a socket just puts the pins closer. With a little creative work you won't need a PCB either. Just solder, add heatsinks as needed and maybe pot the works for durability and to save on an enclosure.

I find it harder to express logic in English than in Code.
Sometimes an example says more than many times as many words.

dritchie0042


What was the reason for multiplying the regulators?  How many ATTinies was that to run?





You can fit 3 Tiny85's on a single 24-pin socket. Each one can put a lot of attention on something.

But if all you want to do is blink lights the 1 Tiny and a set of shift registers will do for many leds.




That is a good idea, but how would you manage the routing of x3 5v regulators on a single sided copper clad board though? That was the real issue.


You don't need a separate regulator per chip. If you get a 5V regulated USB charger for power or any other 5V regulated (you can go with less BTW) power supply then you don't need any regulator on board. Just make sure that your supply has enough amps to run your project, those high-bright leds do suck current and IMO it's better to run them off power that doesn't go through the MCU.

3 on a socket just puts the pins closer. With a little creative work you won't need a PCB either. Just solder, add heatsinks as needed and maybe pot the works for durability and to save on an enclosure.


Well, how many Attiny85's can I run on a single regulator without risking overheating it? Perhaps that is also an input question as well.

I choose 4 regs., for 4 micro processors because it was a safe assumption and guaranteed all would be "fed" properly. I want all Attiny's to have an output of 4+v.

Thanks for the tip on the power/leds btw. I would agree. (On the single boards above that is a lower power led).

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