Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
Author Topic: [solved] Capasitor's in the Arduino Standalone Power suply  (Read 1413 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Holland
Offline Offline
Jr. Member
**
Karma: 0
Posts: 93
Troubles are there to be solved!
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

@Docedison:
hey, i am asking because i am interested in what process these capasitors make an influance.
these are not capasitors i am complaining about. i am currently follow an engerirings education (first year) and was asking you guys with this example. i just wanted the capasitors bieng explained so i can use this explanation to further develop my knowlege about capacitors.

thank you all for your replies, ill take a dive into the accasable information on the web, and use your explaition as a guidence.
i am not fully understanding the capasitors processes, but i have some more grip on why they are there.

nick
Logged

humankind cannot obtain anything without
sacrificing something of equal value.

Cumming, GA
Offline Offline
Edison Member
*
Karma: 20
Posts: 1658
Ultimate DIY: Arduino
View Profile
WWW
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

3 simple rules

Rule #1: Always ALWAYS read and honor the datasheet
Rule #2: Trust but verify someone else's design unless it comes from a manufacturers datasheet
Rule #3: Always question: "Why did some person do this in this design?" 

Regarding #1:  The best way to start understanding datasheets is to read them yourself.  The more you read them... the more they stop seeming like gibberish.

Regarding #2:   Just because you can find an example "on the internet" doesn't not make it right or "best practice". Having a circuit work "most of the time" should never be an end goal.  A good design is one that was created to work under all reasonably possible conditions.

Regarding #3:  If you are not questioning why a designer did something, you are not learning...  BUT  sometimes  hearing the "because we said so" is the easiest answer from the more experienced. 


Final note: It's always a good idea to learn HOW components work.  Here is an example of why you want capacitors across your regulated supply voltage... (including the one at your regulator)  http://www.thebox.myzen.co.uk/Tutorial/De-coupling.html
Logged

Global Moderator
Offline Offline
Brattain Member
*****
Karma: 504
Posts: 19095
Lua rocks!
View Profile
WWW
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

I agree with all of that. I had been falling into the habit of finding a design on the web, and assuming that the person knew what they were doing. But what if they didn't? What if they left out something vital, like a capacitor because it "seemed to work"?

So your best bet is to use the datasheet as a primary reference, and use other people's designs as an aid in understanding.
Logged


Holland
Offline Offline
Jr. Member
**
Karma: 0
Posts: 93
Troubles are there to be solved!
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

thank you very very much everybody!

ill keep learning until i will be able to pass my information onto another person who needs this information later on this arduino forum hehe  smiley-sweat
Nick
Logged

humankind cannot obtain anything without
sacrificing something of equal value.

Offline Offline
Sr. Member
****
Karma: 9
Posts: 296
View Profile
 Bigger Bigger  Smaller Smaller  Reset Reset

Quote
So your best bet is to use the datasheet as a primary reference, and use other people's designs as an aid in understanding.

Yes, but even then some things are just a "given." Looking at datasheet schematics, it's assumed the user knows some basic things. i.e. common sense

For example, an opamp schematic in a datasheet may not even show the power supply pins.... much less show that bypass caps are connected on the same V+ and V- pins. -- it's assumed the user knows and will do so.

It's also assumed the user will connect such bypass caps as close as possible to the IC pins, and not a few inches away. Again, it's a "given/common sense" that datasheets dont need to mention.

Logged

Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
Jump to: